Advertisement

Pretzel knodel (pretzel dumplings)

Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Yields Serves 10
Pretzel knodel (pretzel dumplings)
1

In a large skillet, melt the butter over medium heat and saute the onions until they are translucent.

2

Stir in the parsley and marjoram; cook briefly (until aromatic) and then set aside to let the mixture cool.

3

Place the cubed bread in a large bowl and season, if desired, with salt. (If you used salted pretzels, you may not need to season at all.) In a small saucepan, heat the milk almost to boiling and pour it over the cubed pretzels. Set aside to cool and go relax for 15 minutes.

4

When the bread-milk mixture is cool, mix in the onion-parsley mixture and the eggs. Add the bread crumbs, garlic and white pepper and mix well. If the mixture seems too soft to hold a shape, add more bread crumbs until it is thick enough. The mixture should be firm enough to form into dumplings that hold their shape.

5

Bring a large pot of salted water to a simmer. Dip your hands into cold water and make a test dumpling, about the size of a large golf ball. Lower it gently into the simmering water and cook. If it doesn’t hold up, add more breadcrumbs to the mixture. Once you’ve found the right consistency, shape the mixture into 20 dumplings.

6

Gently lower the dumplings into the simmering salted water and cook until they are puffed slightly and cooked through, about 7 minutes. When they are boiled and sexy, you can take it up to another level and brown them in a saute pan with a tablespoon of butter and some extra chopped parsley. That’s what I do.


Mary MacVean is the former Mind & Body editor at the Los Angeles Times. She’s a runner and a cook, and has worked at The Times as morning assignment editor, web liaison, food writer and copy editor. She was a national editor and writer focusing on food at the Associated Press and a features editor and a columnist in Moscow, where she also ran a children’s cooking school. She left The Times in 2015. 
Newsletter
Get our new Cooking newsletter, coming soon.
You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.