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The House gave final approval for the GOP tax bill Wednesday, with 12 Republicans in the state delegation again voting in favor of the bill. 

Reps. Dana Rohrabacher of Costa Mesa and Darrell Issa of Vista voted no.

The House and Senate both passed the bill Tuesday, but, because Democrats raised procedural objections that forced the bill to be changed in the Senate, the House had to vote on the bill again Wednesday before sending it to President Trump for his signature.

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  • California in Congress
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  • California in Congress
  • 2018 election
House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) arrives for a news conference about the tax plan.
House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) arrives for a news conference about the tax plan. (Win McNamee / Getty Images)

More than half of Californians oppose the GOP tax bill expected to be approved by Congress today, and just 20% believe it will have a positive affect on their families, according to a poll released Monday.

Just over half of California voters, 51%, oppose the tax bill, and 30% support it, according to the newest IGS Poll, a survey by the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley.

And the belief falls largely along party lines, with Democrats opposing the bill by a more than 4-to-1 (67% to 15%) margin and Republicans supporting it 3 to 1 (60% to 21%).

  • California in Congress
  • 2018 election
House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) arrives for a news conference about the tax plan.
House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) arrives for a news conference about the tax plan. (Win McNamee / Getty Images)

More than half of Californians oppose the GOP tax bill expected to be approved by Congress today, and just 20% believe it will have a positive affect on their families, according to a poll released Monday.

Just over half of California voters, 51%, oppose the tax bill, and 30% support it, according to the newest IGS Poll, a survey by the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley.

And the belief falls largely along party lines, with Democrats opposing the bill by a more than 4-to-1 (67% to 15%) margin and Republicans supporting it 3 to 1 (60% to 21%).

  • California in Congress
(Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press)

Congressional Republicans are framing their tax cut bill as a Christmas gift that will give Americans an average tax cut of $2,059. For Californians, especially in the wealthier areas along the coast, the situation isn’t as clear-cut.

When the measure comes up for a vote in the House on Tuesday morning, it’s expected to pass along party lines. At least two Republicans say they will join Democrats in the California delegation to oppose the plan because they fear it will hurt their constituents’ bottom line.

Take a quick look at what some of the biggest changes in the tax bill might mean for average Californians.

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  • California in Congress
(Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press)

Congressional Republicans are framing their tax cut bill as a Christmas gift that will give Americans an average tax cut of $2,059. For Californians, especially in the wealthier areas along the coast, the situation isn’t as clear-cut.

When the measure comes up for a vote in the House on Tuesday morning, it’s expected to pass along party lines. At least two Republicans say they will join Democrats in the California delegation to oppose the plan because they fear it will hurt their constituents’ bottom line.

Take a quick look at what some of the biggest changes in the tax bill might mean for average Californians.

Civil engineer Praj White assesses a site in Humboldt County’s Eel River watershed that is home to a marijuana farm.
Civil engineer Praj White assesses a site in Humboldt County’s Eel River watershed that is home to a marijuana farm. (Humboldt County)

California’s new rules allowing marijuana cultivation favor large corporate farms despite a promise in Proposition 64 that small growers would be protected, according to a group of state lawmakers and marijuana industry leaders who called Monday for the policy to be changed.

The California Department of Food and Agriculture issued emergency rules last month that allow for small and medium-sized farms of up to a quarter acre and one acre, respectively, to get licenses for the first five years. That five-year head start for small farms was promised in Proposition 64, the initiative approved last year by voters that legalized growing and selling marijuana for recreational use.

Individuals and businesses can get only one license for a medium-sized farm, but the new rules do not set a limit on how many small-farm licenses can be obtained by one person or business.

Civil engineer Praj White assesses a site in Humboldt County’s Eel River watershed that is home to a marijuana farm.
Civil engineer Praj White assesses a site in Humboldt County’s Eel River watershed that is home to a marijuana farm. (Humboldt County)

California’s new rules allowing marijuana cultivation favor large corporate farms despite a promise in Proposition 64 that small growers would be protected, according to a group of state lawmakers and marijuana industry leaders who called Monday for the policy to be changed.

The California Department of Food and Agriculture issued emergency rules last month that allow for small and medium-sized farms of up to a quarter acre and one acre, respectively, to get licenses for the first five years. That five-year head start for small farms was promised in Proposition 64, the initiative approved last year by voters that legalized growing and selling marijuana for recreational use.

Individuals and businesses can get only one license for a medium-sized farm, but the new rules do not set a limit on how many small-farm licenses can be obtained by one person or business.

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  • California in Congress
(Bill Clark / CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Grace Napolitano’s husband, Frank Napolitano, died Friday at their home in Norwalk after a battle with cancer.

“The congresswoman loved Frank dearly and is immensely saddened by his passing. He was a devoted husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather,” her office said in a statement.