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268 posts
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
  • 2018 governor's race
Assemblyman Travis Allen, left, and businessman John Cox.
Assemblyman Travis Allen, left, and businessman John Cox. (Genaro Molina / Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

The two top GOP candidates for governor will meet for their first debate in the Inland Empire just after New Year’s Day.

Assemblyman Travis Allen and businessman John Cox will face off on Jan. 4 at a gathering of the Redlands Tea Party Patriots, said John Berry, a spokesman for the group.

The 90-minute debate will take place at the Mill Creek Cattle Company restaurant in Mentone and is open to the public. The candidates will make opening statements and field questions from local activists and audience members about issues such as the recent gas-tax increase and the state’s top-two primary system, Berry said.

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  • California Legislature
Yosemite National Park visitors gather at a viewing spot for Half Dome, shrouded by smoke from nearby fires, in July.
Yosemite National Park visitors gather at a viewing spot for Half Dome, shrouded by smoke from nearby fires, in July. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra and almost a dozen of his counterparts have denounced a National Parks Service proposal to increase entrance fees at 17 popular parks, including some in the state.

“We cannot let the most popular and awe-inspiring national parks become places only for the wealthy,” the attorneys wrote in a letter on Wednesday to the acting director of the National Parks Service. “As Americans, we are all public landowners.”

Federal parks officials announced the proposed fee hikes in late October as part of a proposal to raise money to fix roads, bridges, campgrounds and bathrooms. But in their letter, Becerra and fellow attorneys say facility and infrastructure improvements should not come at the expense of parkgoers.

Read the letter.
Read the letter.
  • California Legislature
The California Assembly in session.
The California Assembly in session. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

The California Legislature has refused to release additional information on sexual harassment complaints requested by the Los Angeles Times in the wake of widespread scrutiny on how the Capitol handles such matters.

Officials representing the Senate and Assembly each said late Tuesday that they were denying a request by The Times, submitted on Nov. 3, for data beginning in 2006 for “all cases involving current and former employees of the [Legislature], current or former members, or any other person who was the subject of an inquiry by the [Legislature] where the charges were found to be true, discipline was imposed or the complaints were judged to be well-founded.”

Daniel Alvarez, the secretary of the Senate, and Debra Gravert, the chief administrative officer of the Assembly, cited the Legislative Open Records Act in denying the request. The act says certain records are exempt from mandatory disclosure, including personnel files and records of complaints to or investigations conducted by the Legislature.

  • 2018 election
  • California Democrats
  • 2018 governor's race
Former LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa with Banc of California Chief Executive Steven Sugarman, left.
Former LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa with Banc of California Chief Executive Steven Sugarman, left. (Robert Gauthier)

Since leaving the Los Angeles mayor’s office in 2013, Antonio Villaraigosa has made more than $4 million by advising companies such as Herbalife, Banc of California and natural resources company Cadiz, teaching at the University of Southern California and earning speaking fees, according to tax returns his gubernatorial campaign released on Tuesday.

In addition, Villaraigosa earns an annual pension payment worth around $100,000 from his years serving in local government.

Villaraigosa is the final Democratic candidate running for governor to release his tax returns. He allowed reporters to review six years of returns Tuesday morning at the San Francisco office of his campaign consultants.

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  • California Legislature
  • California Democrats
Rep. Tony Cardenas (D-Los Angeles)
Rep. Tony Cardenas (D-Los Angeles) (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

U.S. Rep. Tony Cardenas said Tuesday that allegations of sexual harassment made against Assemblyman Raul Bocanegra “describe behavior that's unacceptable under any circumstance” and called for holding people “accountable.”

Cardenas and Bocanegra are both Democrats hailing from the northeast San Fernando Valley and have long been political allies.

Bocanegra announced Monday he would not be seeking reelection and instead would resign on Sept. 1, 2018. The announcement came shortly before The Times reported that six women have accused Bocanegra of unwanted sexual advances.

  • State government
Gov. Jerry Brown, flanked by lawmakers, appears at a news conference after the Legislature approved extending California's cap-and-trade program.
Gov. Jerry Brown, flanked by lawmakers, appears at a news conference after the Legislature approved extending California's cap-and-trade program. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

California’s cap-and-trade program received another boost Tuesday, with its most recent permit auction reaching record-high sales, according to details released by regulators Tuesday.

The regular auctions are a key feature of the program, which requires companies to buy permits to release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Cap and trade is one of the state’s main strategies to combat climate change.

In November’s auction, every permit offered by the state was sold, and prices reached their highest-level in the program’s five-year history.

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  • California in Congress
Young immigrants demand Congress act to preserve the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program during a protest on Capitol Hill on Nov. 9.
Young immigrants demand Congress act to preserve the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program during a protest on Capitol Hill on Nov. 9. (Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

California business leaders on Tuesday said they want to send a resounding message to federal lawmakers: Reauthorize DACA.

On a conference call with reporters, members of the Regional Economic Assn. Leaders Coalition of California said the termination of the Obama-era program would be a devastating blow to the nation’s economy — one hard felt across the state.

DACA provides temporary legal status and work protections for some 700,000 young immigrants known as “Dreamers.” California has the highest number of recipients, roughly 222,800, who live, work or attend schools in the state.

  • California Legislature
  • California Democrats
  • Sexual harassment