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268 posts
  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
Ammar Campa-Najjar, 28, is running against Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Alpine).
Ammar Campa-Najjar, 28, is running against Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Alpine). (Hayne Palmour IV / San Diego Union-Tribune)

With an already crowded field of contenders hoping to unseat Rep. Duncan Hunter and months to go before the candidate filing deadline, one local activist group has made an early endorsement in the race.

Indivisible CA50, made up of activists mostly in San Diego County, announced Thursday that it’s endorsing Ammar Campa-Najjar, a Democrat and public affairs consultant who’s challenging Hunter.

The endorsement comes as liberal activists and interest groups all over the state are grappling with whether — and how — to winnow down the dozens of candidates vying for 10 GOP-held seats in California.

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San Francisco is the city everyone loves, even if they hate it.

The stately Victorians, like a gingerbread dream come to life. The majestic Golden Gate Bridge, standing like heaven’s portal above the fog. The plucky cable cars, scrabbling up its impossible hillsides.

It can almost make you forget the bands of ravaged homeless, the paralyzing traffic, the scent of human waste wafting from sidewalks outside the city’s posh eateries and palatial tech headquarters.

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  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
(Sara Jacobs for Congress)

National abortion rights behemoth Emily’s List has made its next choice among California’s vast array of Democratic congressional challengers. 

The group announced Thursday it’s endorsing Democrat Sara Jacobs, a former policy advisor for Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign who most recently served as CEO of a New York nonprofit.

Jacobs, 28, is also the granddaughter of Qualcomm founder Irwin Jacobs and is the only woman so far to enter the race for Rep. Darrell Issa’s seat. 

State Senate leader Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles), left, and Assemblyman Miguel Santiago (D-Los Angeles), right.
State Senate leader Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles), left, and Assemblyman Miguel Santiago (D-Los Angeles), right. (Damian Dovarganes / Associated Press)

Taking direct criticism to the woman he is attempting to unseat in next year’s U.S. Senate race, California Senate leader Kevin de León on Wednesday urged Democrats to block a year-end spending bill as leverage to pass a Dream Act — “clean” of GOP demands for increased border security. 

At a news conference in downtown Los Angeles, De León commended Sen. Kamala Harris for pledging to block the measure, saying he could not understand why her colleague Sen. Dianne Feinstein had failed to take a similar stance in pushing for legislation to protect the so-called Dreamers, immigrants brought to the country illegally as children.

“Dreamers make up hundreds of thousands of Sen. Feinstein’s constituents, and while talking a good game on Dreamers, when it comes to standing up and supporting them, she is AWOL,” said De León (D-Los Angeles), who has attempted to position himself to Feinstein’s left as he campaigns for her seat.

  • California in Congress
(Bill Clark / CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-San Jose) lost a vote Tuesday to become the highest-ranking Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee.

The House Democratic Caucus, by a 118-72 tally, instead picked Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) to replace outgoing Rep. John Conyers Jr. 

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The House gave final approval for the GOP tax bill Wednesday, with 12 Republicans in the state delegation again voting in favor of the bill. 

Reps. Dana Rohrabacher of Costa Mesa and Darrell Issa of Vista voted no.

The House and Senate both passed the bill Tuesday, but, because Democrats raised procedural objections that forced the bill to be changed in the Senate, the House had to vote on the bill again Wednesday before sending it to President Trump for his signature.

  • California in Congress
  • California in Congress
  • 2018 election
House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) arrives for a news conference about the tax plan.
House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) arrives for a news conference about the tax plan. (Win McNamee / Getty Images)

More than half of Californians oppose the GOP tax bill expected to be approved by Congress today, and just 20% believe it will have a positive affect on their families, according to a poll released Monday.

Just over half of California voters, 51%, oppose the tax bill, and 30% support it, according to the newest IGS Poll, a survey by the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley.

And the belief falls largely along party lines, with Democrats opposing the bill by a more than 4-to-1 (67% to 15%) margin and Republicans supporting it 3 to 1 (60% to 21%).

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  • California in Congress
(Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press)

Congressional Republicans are framing their tax cut bill as a Christmas gift that will give Americans an average tax cut of $2,059. For Californians, especially in the wealthier areas along the coast, the situation isn’t as clear-cut.

When the measure comes up for a vote in the House on Tuesday morning, it’s expected to pass along party lines. At least two Republicans say they will join Democrats in the California delegation to oppose the plan because they fear it will hurt their constituents’ bottom line.

Take a quick look at what some of the biggest changes in the tax bill might mean for average Californians.

Civil engineer Praj White assesses a site in Humboldt County’s Eel River watershed that is home to a marijuana farm.
Civil engineer Praj White assesses a site in Humboldt County’s Eel River watershed that is home to a marijuana farm. (Humboldt County)

California’s new rules allowing marijuana cultivation favor large corporate farms despite a promise in Proposition 64 that small growers would be protected, according to a group of state lawmakers and marijuana industry leaders who called Monday for the policy to be changed.

The California Department of Food and Agriculture issued emergency rules last month that allow for small and medium-sized farms of up to a quarter acre and one acre, respectively, to get licenses for the first five years. That five-year head start for small farms was promised in Proposition 64, the initiative approved last year by voters that legalized growing and selling marijuana for recreational use.

Individuals and businesses can get only one license for a medium-sized farm, but the new rules do not set a limit on how many small-farm licenses can be obtained by one person or business.