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Dealers who sell certain signed collectibles will soon be required to provide express warranty

Star Wars actor Mark Hamill supported an effort to crack down on fake autographs in 2016. (Justin Tallis / AFP/Getty Images)
Star Wars actor Mark Hamill supported an effort to crack down on fake autographs in 2016. (Justin Tallis / AFP/Getty Images)

Gov. Jerry Brown signed off Thursday on a legislative fix to the state’s law regulating autographed memorabilia. 

AB 228 will require dealers who sell signed sports and entertainment collectibles for more than $50 to provide an express warranty starting in January 2018. 

The measure, proposed by Assemblyman Todd Gloria (D-San Diego), aimed to address some unintended consequences that arose from a bill passed during the previous legislative session.

That law required all signed collectibles sold for more than $5 to come with certificates verifying their authenticity.

After the law became active, there were concerns about the effect on book and comic book stores that often host author signings. Because it applied to any autographed item, owners were required to provide certificates for signed books.

Under the new law Brown signed, autographed books, fine art, furniture and decorative objects are excluded from the express warranty requirement. 

Stars Wars actor Mark Hamill supported the 2016 proposal after fans reached out to him on Twitter to ask whether their items had his real signature. 

The new measure allows buyers to pursue civil action against a dealer if they fail to comply with express warranty provisions. Previously, customers who didn’t receive an authenticity certificate were entitled to recover damages worth 10 times the cost of the memorabilia.

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