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Caramelized fig cake with lemon anglaise

Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Yields Serves 8
Caramelized fig cake with lemon anglaise
(Los Angeles Times)

Lemon anglaise

1

Whisk all of the ingredients together in a small saucepan until the arrowroot is dissolved. Place over medium heat and simmer until slightly thickened, about 7 minutes. The mixture does not need to boil.

2

Remove from heat and let the lemon zest steep for 10 minutes. Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh strainer. Let it cool, uncovered, in the refrigerator. ( You can store it, covered, in the refrigerator for up to one week. Makes about 1 1/2 cups.)

Fig cake

1

Brush a 9-inch round cake pan with 1 teaspoon of the canola oil, and line it with parchment paper. Sprinkle the Sucanat onto the parchment and top with the sliced figs, fanning them out decoratively.

2

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Using a spice grinder or food processor, grind the almonds to a meal. Place in a bowl. Sift the white flour, pastry flour, baking powder, baking soda, egg replacer and salt into the bowl.

3

In a separate bowl, whisk the almond milk, agave, remaining 3 tablespoons of canola oil, vanilla extract, almond extract, lemon juice, sherry and lemon zest. Pour the wet ingredients into the almond mixture and whisk just until smooth.

4

Pour the mixture on top of the figs in the prepared pan. Carefully smooth out the batter with a spatula (being careful not to disturb the fan of figs on the bottom of the pan). Bake for 35 to 40 minutes, until the top is lightly browned and a toothpick or small knife inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean. Let it cool in the pan for 10 minutes and then invert it onto a serving plate. Remove parchment paper. (You can store, wrapped tightly, in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. After 2 days, you will need to rewarm it for the best flavor.)

5

To serve, cut the cake into 8 pieces. Spoon some of the lemon sauce on each plate and place a slice of warm cake on top.

Adapted from the cookbook “The Artful Vegan: Fresh Flavors From the Millennium Restaurant,” by Eric Tucker with Bruce Enloe, desserts by Amy Pearce (Ten Speed Press, November 2003). Sucanat is a brand-name, unrefined, granulated sugar, and a powdered egg substitute is used instead of eggs; both, along with almond milk, are available in natural foods stores.

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