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Chilled corn soup

Time 2 hours
Yields This makes a scant 8 ounces soup or 4 (1/4-cup) servings
Chilled corn soup
(Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)
1

Remove the kernels from all 5 ears of corn and weigh out 150 grams, saving the rest of the kernels for use later in the recipe. Place the measured kernels in a large bowl under running water and agitate the kernels to remove all hairs and other impurities. Seal the cleaned kernels in a cryovac bag at 100% vacuum with the butter, salt and sugar. Cook sous-vide at 185 degrees Fahrenheit (85 degrees Celsius) for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside to cool.

2

Place the corncobs in a pot, add water to just cover and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook for 45 minutes. Strain out the cobs and reserve 50 grams of the corn stock, saving the rest for another use.

3

In a small saucepan, gently heat the cream until it reduces by half. Measure 20 grams of the reduced cream, saving the rest for another use.

4

Juice the remaining corn kernels and, without straining, reserve 100 grams of the juice. In a bowl set over a pot of simmering water, cook the juice, stirring constantly to avoid scorching, until it begins to thicken to a pudding consistency, approximately 10 minutes. Add in the reduced cream and set the mixture aside to cool.

5

Combine the cooled cream mixture with the cooked corn kernels and puree in a blender, thinning as necessary with the measured corn stock to achieve the desired consistency. Pass the puree through a chinois and season with salt to taste. Chill before serving in demitasse cups.

This recipe calls for the use of a kitchen scale and a juicer, both of which can be found at most home and kitchen supply stores, as well as online (the Test Kitchen tested the recipe using a blender instead of a juicer and passing the puree through a strainer). This recipe also calls for a chinois, which can be found at most cooking and restaurant supply stores, as well as online. This recipe also calls for sous-vide cooking; when testing the recipe, the Test Kitchen used a vacuum sealer for the corn, butter, salt and sugar, and regulated the temperature in a large pot of water using a probe thermometer.

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