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The Foundry on Melrose chopped salad

Time 1 hour
Yields Serves 8 as an appetizer or 4 as a main dish
The Foundry on Melrose chopped salad
1

Heat the oven to 250 degrees. Peel, seed and cut the tomatoes into quarters. Toss them with 3 tablespoons olive oil and sprinkle lightly with salt, about 1 teaspoon. Arrange the tomatoes on a rack on a baking sheet and bake until dried, 2 1/2 to 3 hours. Remove the tomatoes from the oven and allow to cool on the rack. Dice the cooled tomatoes into one-fourth-inch pieces. You should have about 6 tablespoons.

2

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Roast the squash and beets in a small baking pan just until tender, about 12 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to cool, but leave the oven on at 350 degrees to toast the pistachios.

3

Toast the pistachios on a baking sheet 5 to 7 minutes until lightly toasted, then remove from the oven and allow to cool.

4

In a large bowl, toss together the roasted tomatoes, butternut squash, beets, pistachios, fennel, celery, cucumber, currants, piquillo peppers, grated cheeses and mixed greens.

5

In a small bowl, whisk together the balsamic vinegar and the remaining 3 tablespoons olive oil until blended. Stir in the raisins. Drizzle enough dressing over the salad to coat, and sprinkle over a dash of salt. Toss to combine. Serve immediately.

Adapted from a recipe by Eric Greenspan, chef-owner of the Foundry on Melrose. You can substitute provolone or mozzarella cheese. Store-bought sun-dried tomatoes can be substituted for the oven-dried tomatoes. Piquillo peppers are available at some gourmet shops. You can also use roasted red peppers.

Betty Hallock was the deputy Food editor, covering all things food and drink for the Saturday section and Daily Dish blog. She started at The Times in 2001 in the Business section and previously worked on the National desk at the Wall Street Journal in New York. She’s a graduate of UCLA and New York University.
Donna Deane
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