Politics
How do you think Trump did this week? Let us know
ENTERTAINMENT

Here's what's new and interesting in the world of entertainment and the arts today:

Arts

A tour through dark chapters of American history hits close to home at site of internment camp

A banner hung in place in a barracks at Camp Tulelake depicts what it looked like when it housed Japanese American internees during World War II. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)
A banner hung in place in a barracks at Camp Tulelake depicts what it looked like when it housed Japanese American internees during World War II. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

Over the last month, I’ve logged some serious mileage across California for a story about race and the national parks that was published on Sunday. It explores the ways in which the National Park Service, a federal agency originally charged with protecting wilderness, has come to conserve places that have been the sites of both contentious and inspiring incidents related to race in American history.

As part of the assignment, I toured the Port Chicago Naval Magazine outside San Francisco and sat next to the graves of labor activists Cesar and Helen Chavez in the bucolic Tehachapi Mountains outside Bakersfield. I visited the sites of the former Japanese American internment camps at Tulelake and Manzanar.

On one of those journeys, I casually posted a photograph of an old theater on Tulelake’s main street on social media. My pal Nate Chinen, a New York-based jazz writer whose father was Japanese American, left me a comment: “This is the town where my father spent his first four years, in internment.”

When I saw it, my heart sank.

An exhibit of articles inside a replica barracks at Manzanar National Historic Site. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)
An exhibit of articles inside a replica barracks at Manzanar National Historic Site. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

Latest updates

Copyright © 2017, Los Angeles Times
60°