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Deviled eggs with smoked fish

Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Yields Makes 24 deviled eggs
Deviled eggs with smoked fish
(Calvin B. Alagot / Los Angeles Times)

Garlic aioli

1

In a blender, beat together the mustard, egg yolks and garlic. Slowly drizzle in the canola oil until emulsified, adding ice water if needed to thin the mixture and keep it cool. Beat in lemon juice to taste, then slowly beat in the olive oil. Season with ½ teaspoon salt, or to taste. Pass the mixture through a fine strainer, discarding any garlic solids. This makes about 2 cups aioli, which will keep, covered and refrigerated, up to 1 week.

Deviled eggs

1

In the bowl of a food processor, pulse together the egg yolks, Dijon mustard, mustard powder, lemon juice and aioli until smooth. Pass the mixture through a very fine strainer into a bowl. Fold in the horseradish, whole grain mustard and parsley. Season with ¼ teaspoon salt and a pinch of pepper, or to taste. This makes about 1 ¾ cups yolk mixture.

2

Prepare the garnishes: Very finely slice the radishes and set aside. In a small bowl, toss the chives with a little rice wine vinegar and olive oil to coat.

3

To prepare the eggs, fill the cavity of each egg white with yolk mixture. Top with flaked smoked fish, a radish slice and a sprinkling of chives.

Adapted from a recipe by chef Govind Armstrong of Post & Beam restaurant.. Armstrong makes his own smoked catfish but recommends substituting store-bought or made smoked trout, salmon or shrimp. He also makes his own garlic aioli but you can substitute any good, whole egg mayonnaise. Although many recipes, such as the aioli, call for raw egg yolks, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends that diners -- especially children, seniors, pregnant women and those with compromised immune systems -- avoid eating them.

Jenn Harris is a senior writer for the Food section and is also the fried chicken queen of L.A. She has a BA in literary journalism from UCI and an MA in journalism from USC. Follow her @Jenn_Harris_.
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