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Shrimp Piri piri with quick-preserved Meyer lemons

Time 50 minutes
Yields Serves 4
Shrimp Piri piri with quick-preserved Meyer lemons
(Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

Quick-preserved Meyer lemons

1

Using a vegetable peeler, peel the lemons, trying to keep away from the white pith. (If necessary, scrape any pith away from the peels with a small knife.) Squeeze the juice from the peeled lemons into a bowl and reserve: You should have about 1 cup. Add water to bring the liquid up to 2 cups; set aside to reserve.

2

Place the peel and 2 cups of water in a saucepan and bring to a rolling boil. Drain. Repeat this procedure once more. Return the drained peel to the pan, add the reserved juice, salt and sugar and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Makes about three-eighths cup.

Shrimp piri piri

1

In a medium saucepan with a tight-fitting lid, cook the black rice according to the package instructions (about 30 minutes) and reserve.

2

In a food processor, combine the chiles, garlic, cilantro, parsley, lemon juice and one-eighth cup of the preserved lemon peel and process until the mixture is a coarse paste. Add one-half cup olive oil in a slow stream and reserve. (Makes 1 cup.)

3

In a large bowl, toss the shrimp in the sauce and allow to marinate, covered and refrigerated, for 30 minutes.

4

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet over high heat until it shimmers, then add the marinated shrimp. Toss for 3 to 4 minutes until the shrimp is opaque, taking care not to overcook. Season with kosher salt.

5

Serve the shrimp over the black rice, garnished with the remaining preserved lemon and a little chopped cilantro.

This recipe is an adaption and combining of two recipes from Marcus Samuelsson’s “The Soul of a New Cuisine.” Piri piri is an African dish named for a hot chile pepper. We substitute jalapenos. Black (Forbidden) rice is available at selected supermarkets and food specialty stores.

Amy Scattergood is a staff writer for the Food section of the Los Angeles Times.
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