Economic analyst Larry Kudlow speaks on the set of CNBC in New York on March 8.
Economic analyst Larry Kudlow speaks on the set of CNBC in New York on March 8. (Bryan R. Smith / AFP/Getty Images)

Larry Kudlow on Wednesday accepted an offer from President Trump to head the White House’s National Economic Council, according to three people familiar with the decision.

Kudlow had been seen as the front-runner, but Trump formally offered Kudlow the job Wednesday to replace former Goldman Sachs executive Gary Cohn, who resigned last week after losing a fight over imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports.

Kudlow, 70, is described by White House officials as someone who connects with the president personally and politically. Kudlow, born and raised in New Jersey, shares with Trump a hard-charging personality and a fondness for being a media figure, and both have hosted television programs. Kudlow has also been an informal Trump advisor over the past year.


President Trump is rarely at a loss for words, but Stormy Daniels has left him virtually mute as she and her hard-charging lawyer filed a lawsuit and kicked up a storm of publicity over Trump's alleged extramarital affair with the porn actress.

It's a rare turn of roles for a president for whom almost nothing is off limits for personal commentary.

President Trump campaigning Saturday with Republican House candidate Rick Saccone
President Trump campaigning Saturday with Republican House candidate Rick Saccone (Jeff Swensen / Getty Images)

The most dangerous outcome for Republicans in Tuesday's special House election is not the prospect of a Democrat taking over one of their seats.

It was the shrugging off by voters of the party's biggest legislative achievement: the tax cut measure that Republicans hoped would be their major campaign message as they head toward a turbulent midterm election.

Though the popularity of Trump's tax plan has grown since it was passed last year, it seemed to have stalled as an election issue in Pennsylvania, leading Republicans to shift away from it late in the campaign in search of another topic to energize supporters of state legislator Rick Saccone.

As the financial system teetered on the brink of meltdown in the fall of 2008, former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan — known for years as "the Oracle" — admitted he had been blindsided by the housing crash and breakdown in the credit markets.

"This crisis … has turned out to be much broader than anything I could have imagined," a chastened Greenspan testified before a House committee, which had summoned him to determine why one of the nation's key financial regulators had failed to see the dangers in the explosive growth in subprime lending.

  • Congress
Rep. Jeff Denham (R-Turlock).
Rep. Jeff Denham (R-Turlock). (Douglas Graham / Roll Call)

Two Central Valley Republicans are trying to force an immigration debate this year, including on bills House Republican leaders don’t support.

“We should have a full debate before the American people,” said the measure’s sponsor, Rep. Jeff Denham (R-Turlock). “This forces the debate.”

If passed, the resolution by Denham and Rep. David Valadao (R-Hanford) would invoke a little-known measure to bring four immigration reform bills to the House floor without the approval of committees or leadership. The bills include one favored by the Trump administration, one preferred by Democrats, a bipartisan proposal and any other immigration bill of House Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s choice.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson bade an emotional farewell Tuesday to the department he ran for 14 months, praising the often dangerous work of foreign service envoys and the military, saying they all agree that “U.S. leadership starts with diplomacy.”

Tillerson did not mention President Trump by name in his first public comments since Trump announced on Twitter early Tuesday that he was firing Tillerson and replacing him with Mike Pompeo, who heads the CIA.

Speaking to a crowded press room at the State Department, Tillerson alluded to a brief conversation with “the president,” who spoke to him from Air Force One en route to California. 

(Ethan Miller / Getty Images)

President Trump’s legal team did not respond Tuesday to an offer by Stormy Daniels to return the $130,000 that she received in return for agreeing to stay silent about Trump’s alleged extramarital affair with her, according to a lawyer for the porn actress.

The lawyer, Michael Avenatti, had set a deadline of 9 a.m. Pacific time for Trump’s lawyers to accept her offer to settle the lawsuit that Daniels filed against the president last week in Los Angeles.

Trump and his personal lawyer Michael Cohen let the deadline pass with no answer, Daniels’ attorney Michael Avenatti said on Twitter.

President Trump speaks to reporters before boarding Marine One on Tuesday.
President Trump speaks to reporters before boarding Marine One on Tuesday. (Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)

The White House fired one of Rex Tillerson's top aides after he contradicted the official account of how and when the secretary of State was dismissed by President Trump. 

Steve Goldstein, the undersecretary of state for public diplomacy and public affairs, was told of his dismissal shortly after he released a statement to reporters saying that Tillerson had been “unaware of the reason” for his firing. Goldstein told reporters that Tillerson learned of his firing Tuesday morning when Trump announced the move on Twitter.

In a statement, Goldstein said that “serving as the Under Secretary of State has been the honor of a lifetime. I am grateful to the President and to Secretary Tillerson for having had this opportunity.”

  • White House
John McEntee, left, served as the president's personal assistant.
John McEntee, left, served as the president's personal assistant. (Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)

President Trump has fired his White House personal assistant, John McEntee, who had been with the president since early in his campaign, an administration official confirmed Tuesday. The president's campaign then announced McEntee will rejoin the campaign as a senior advisor of operations.

McEntee is the latest in a series of departures by West Wing officials, including communications director Hope Hicks and staff secretary Rob Porter. It was not clear why McEntee was let go. The Wall Street Journal first reported on the firing, citing an unspecified security issue.

Trump has had a record rate of turnover in his senior staff. Before McEntee's departure, 43% of the president's executive staff had left in the first 13 1/2 months. McEntee's departure was overshadowed by the news that Trump fired Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and nominated CIA Director Mike Pompeo to replace him. Gina Haspel — the deputy director at the CIA — will succeed Pompeo at the CIA, becoming the first woman to run the spy agency, if confirmed.