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(Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press)

Paul Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign chairman, has been indicted again, this time on charges of obstruction of justice and conspiracy to obstruct justice.

The new charges were announced Friday by the special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

Also indicted was Konstantin Kilimnik, a Manafort business partner whom Mueller has accused of having ties to Russian intelligence. 

The charges involve allegations that Manafort and Kilimnik tried to convince people to lie about an undisclosed lobbying effort on behalf of Ukraine’s former pro-Russian government.

Mueller unveiled the accusations earlier this week when telling a federal judge that Manafort may have violated the terms of his bail.

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Three Democratic senators want federal regulators to investigate whether there was any manipulation in financial markets after President Trump’s tweet last week suggesting a strong jobs report was about to be released.

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Muhammad Ali speaks to the Illinois Athletic Commission in Chicago in February 1966.
Muhammad Ali speaks to the Illinois Athletic Commission in Chicago in February 1966. (Associated Press)

President Trump said Friday he may pardon the late heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali, and for futures acts of clemency, he may seek recommendations from pro football players and other athletes who have protested racial injustice by kneeling during the national anthem.

Trump said that "instead of talk," he is going to ask protesting players to suggest "people that they think were unfairly treated by the justice system." The president said that football players have "seen a lot of abuse" and "a lot of unfairness" and that he wants their input on his use of this executive power.

Trump told reporters as he left the White House for a meeting in Canada with U.S. allies that his team was "looking at literally thousands of names" of people for potential pardons because they were treated unfairly or their sentences are too long.

Southern California biotech giant Amgen Inc. opened its first state-of-the-art factory in Singapore in 2014 and executives were preparing late last year to pick the spot for a second one.

When President Trump turned against the global tide and withdrew from the landmark, multi-nation Iran nuclear deal, he cited its failure to curtail the Islamic Republic’s other “malign behavior.”

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President Trump met Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday before the weekend Group of 7 summit, which Trump now plans to skip early.
President Trump met Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday before the weekend Group of 7 summit, which Trump now plans to skip early. (Susan Walsh / Associated Press)

President Trump will leave the weekend Group of 7 summit early, the White House announced Thursday night amid an intensifying battle over his decision to impose tariffs on some of the United States' closest allies.

The White House announcement followed Trump’s tweets earlier in the evening attacking Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the summit host, and French President Emmanuel Macron, who will attend, for criticizing him over the tariffs.

Trump is to fly to the two-day summit in Quebec on Friday but now plans to depart earlier, at 10:30 a.m. Eastern time on Saturday. He will travel directly to Singapore, ahead of his scheduled meeting there with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Monday night.

Federal law enforcement officials seized several years’ worth of email and phone records from a reporter who currently works for the New York Times, the paper reported Thursday.

The seized material does not include the contents of the emails, but does include customer records from Verizon and Google covering two email accounts and a phone used by the reporter, Ali Watkins.

The seizures would mark the first known time that the Justice Department under President Trump has authorized prosecutors to obtain a reporter’s records as part of a leak investigation.

President Trump greets French President Emmanuel Macron in April.
President Trump greets French President Emmanuel Macron in April. (Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

It may or may not be a trade war. But it’s definitely a Twitter war. Between friends.

On the eve of the annual summit of the so-called G-7 economic powers in Quebec, President Trump traded thinly veiled insults over trade with French President Emmanuel Macron, who has worked to be one of Trump’s closest friends on the world stage — to little avail.

Trump also took a shot at another ally, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, following Trudeau’s criticisms of the president’s tariffs on steel and aluminum imports.

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During his campaign, Donald Trump lashed U.S. presidents for cutting “stupid” foreign deals, alleging that they gave too much away to allies and adversaries alike, and insisted “the world is laughing at America's politicians.”

House Republicans emerged from a meeting Thursday morning without clear agreement on immigration legislation, opening the door for a group of moderate lawmakers to move forward with a maneuver to force a vote — over GOP leaders’ objections — on the divisive issue.