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(Shawn Thew / EPA/Shutterstock)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Thursday he disagrees with the Trump administration policy of separating immigrant children from their parents at the border.

"We don't want kids to be separated from their parents. We believe because of the court ruling, this will require legislative change," Ryan said.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) disputed that legislation is needed.

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(Saul Loeb / AFP/Getty Images)

New York's attorney general says President Trump's foundation served as a personal piggy bank for his businesses, legal bills and presidential campaign. 

Democratic Atty. Gen. Barbara Underwood filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the foundation and its directors, Trump and his children Donald Trump Jr., Eric Trump and Ivanka Trump. The suit seeks $2.8 million in restitution and the dissolution of the foundation. 

Underwood says the foundation illegally helped support the Republican's campaign by raising money at a nationally televised fundraiser in January 2016, then allowing campaign staffers to dictate how the money was spent in grants. 
 

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As President Trump declared his summit with Kim Jong Un a smashing success, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo quickly began the hard part: negotiating the complex details for a deal to eliminate North Korea's nuclear threat.

Mark Sanford blew up his marriage and became a national laughingstock when he sneaked off his job as South Carolina governor for a tryst with his Argentine lover.

When leaders of a powerful congressional committee turned their attention this month to the scourge of foreign agents plotting to weaken American democracy, they didn’t target Eastern European hackers or shadowy international political operatives.

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President Trump shakes hands with North Korea leader Kim Jong Un at the Capella resort on Sentosa Island in Singapore.
President Trump shakes hands with North Korea leader Kim Jong Un at the Capella resort on Sentosa Island in Singapore. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

President Trump declared Wednesdayon Twitter that there was "no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea," a bold and questionable claim following his summit with leader Kim Jong Un that produced few guarantees on how and when Pyongyang would disarm.

Trump and Kim were returning to their respective strongholds following the talks — but to far different receptions.

In Pyongyang, the North Korean autocrat woke up to state media's enthusiastic claims of a victorious meeting with the U.S. president; photos of him standing side-by-side with Trump on the world stage were splashed across newspapers. Trump, meanwhile, faced questions about whether he gave away too much in return for far too little when he bestowed a new legitimacy on Kim's rule and agreed, at Pyongyang's request, to end war games with Seoul that the allies had long portrayed as crucial to Asian safety.

GOP House leaders have bumped up against the Tuesday deadline set by moderate Republicans to come up with a compromise immigration proposal. Otherwise, the dissidents intend to act to force a vote on four immigration bills later this month.

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  • White House
White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow this month.
White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow this month. (Susan Walsh / Associated Press)

White House chief economic advisor Larry Kudlow suffered a heart attack Monday, according to President Trump. 

“Our Great Larry Kudlow, who has been working so hard on trade and the economy, has just suffered a heart attack. He is now in Walter Reed Medical Center," Trump said on Twitter on Monday night.

The tweet came as the president was in a motorcade traveling from his Singapore hotel to the site of a historic summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. 

  • Supreme Court
  • Midterm Election
U.S. Supreme Court
U.S. Supreme Court (Dreamstime)

A sharply divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that states may remove people from voting rolls who did not cast a ballot in one election and failed to respond to notices.

The 5-4 decision by Justice Samuel Alito upheld Ohio's voting rules. Challengers argued that the Ohio practice violated federal law and discriminated against lower-income voters, who move often and might miss notices mailed to their old address.