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Paul Manafort.
Paul Manafort. (AFP-Getty Images)

Paul Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign manager, was found guilty today on eight counts in the bank and tax fraud case against him. The jury remained undecided on the remaining 10 counts.

The verdicts come after prosecutors laid out what they said was Manafort’s scheme to illegally hide tens of millions of dollars he earned as a political consultant in Ukraine. They said he also committed fraud to obtain millions more in bank loans and mortgages. Manafort did not testify in his own defense.

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  • White House

The jury in the financial fraud trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort asked the judge Tuesday what it should do if it cannot reach a consensus for a single count in the case. 

Jurors posed the question to U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III on their fourth day of deliberations, asking how they should fill in the verdict form if they are unable to agree on one of the charges. 

The jury in Alexandria, Va., is weighing 18 counts against Manafort, who is accused of hiding millions of dollars in foreign income from Ukraine and of lying on loan applications to maintain a lavish lifestyle. 

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  • Environment
The Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo., in July.
The Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo., in July. (J. David Ake / Associated Press)

The Trump administration on Tuesday unveiled a sweeping rewrite of emissions rules for power plants in a boon to the coal industry, laying the groundwork for a revival of the most polluting facilities and abandoning Obama-era mandates for reorienting the electricity sector toward clean energy.

The Environmental Protection Agency called the regulations on coal power plants "overly prescriptive and burdensome."

The replacement for the federal Clean Power Plan reflects a dramatic about-face on national climate action. It is President Trump’s second major move in less than a month reflecting a retreat in the fight against global warming, following the administration’s plan to freeze fuel-economy standards for cars and trucks.

  • White House
  • Immigration
President Trump greets Border Patrol Agent Adrian Anzaldua.
President Trump greets Border Patrol Agent Adrian Anzaldua. (Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)

President Trump invited a U.S. Border Patrol agent to the podium during a White House event to pay tribute to federal immigration officials and joked that the agent could speak "perfect English."

Trump asked the agent, Adrian Anzaldua, to discuss his apprehension of a smuggler accused of locking 78 migrants inside a truck near Laredo, Texas, about a week ago.

Trump also appeared to refer to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, or CBP, as CBC during Monday's event. CBC stands for Congressional Black Caucus, among other things.

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The hamburgers and hot dogs were all consumed by the time Michael Avenatti arrived and delivered what the Donald Trump-loathing crowd was hungering to hear.

Paul Manafort, Trump's former campaign chief.
Paul Manafort, Trump's former campaign chief. (Mandel Ngan /AFP-Getty Images)

The jury in the fraud trial of Paul Manafort, President’s Trump former campaign chairman, has been sent home for the weekend after concluding a second day of deliberations without reaching a verdict.

Federal Judge T.S. Ellis III sent jurors home around 5 p.m. Friday. That was about a half-hour earlier than normal, at the request of a juror who had an unspecified event to attend.

The Alexandria, Va., jury is weighing hundreds of pieces of evidence and an 18-count indictment accusing Manafort of tax fraud, bank fraud and failing to disclose foreign bank accounts. Prosecutors say Manafort hid from the IRS tens of millions of dollars he earned advising Ukrainian politicians. When the Ukrainian money dried up, prosecutors say he lied to obtain millions in bank loans to maintain his lifestyle.

  • White House
  • Russia
President Trump speaks to the media outside the White House before departing for New York on Aug. 17.
President Trump speaks to the media outside the White House before departing for New York on Aug. 17. (Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

President Trump said Friday he expects to "quickly" revoke the security clearance of the Justice Department official whose wife worked for the firm involved in producing the dossier on Trump's ties to Russia.

Trump said the official, Bruce Ohr, is a "disgrace."

Asked about Ohr's security clearance, Trump said: "I suspect I'll be taking it away very quickly. For him to be in the Justice Department and doing what he did, that is a disgrace."

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Clad in military jackets, with bandannas hiding their faces, Eddie Alvarez and other members of the Brown Berets clashed with other protesters in Murrieta in July 2014.

Military units participate in the inaugural parade from the Capitol to the White House in Washington on Jan. 20, 2017.
Military units participate in the inaugural parade from the Capitol to the White House in Washington on Jan. 20, 2017. (Cliff Owen / Associated Press)

A U.S. official says the Veterans Day military parade ordered by President Trump would cost about $92 million — more than three times the maximum initial estimate.

The official — who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss plans that haven't been released yet — says about $50 million would cover Pentagon costs for equipment, personnel and other support for the November parade in Washington. The remainder would be borne by other agencies and would include security costs.

Details are not final and haven't been approved by Defense Secretary James N. Mattis.