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Democrats don't seem to have the votes to keep Brett Kavanaugh from joining the Supreme Court, but that's not stopping them from taking to the Senate floor in a parade of speeches into the early morning against the conservative jurist.

Hours before the expected roll call vote that would elevate the appeals court judge to the nation's highest court, Democrats are making clear their strong opposition.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York says there's one fundamental question for senators when they decide Kavanaugh's fate: "Do we, as a country, value women?"

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First Lady Melania Trump.
First Lady Melania Trump. (Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

Melania Trump is offering some supportive words for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Here's what she tells reporters traveling with her in Egypt: "I think he's highly qualified for the Supreme Court."

The first lady is wrapping up a four-country tour of Africa.

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Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine said Friday she will support Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court, likely securing his confirmation over the weekend.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) voted against moving forward with the nomination and later said she would oppose Kavanaugh in the final vote. She was the first Republican to break with the party and join most Democrats in opposing Kavanaugh.

Another potential swing vote, Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), voted yes on Friday’s motion to end the debate over Kavanaugh. He later said he would vote for confirmation barring some sudden, unexpected development. He was instrumental in delaying the vote to allow for a renewed FBI probe this week.

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Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) walks to the Senate floor on Friday.
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) walks to the Senate floor on Friday. (Drew Angerer / Getty Images)

The Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh advanced Friday in a narrow 51-49 vote, but there are no guarantees the final vote, expected as early as Saturday, will have the same outcome.

The final result is largely in the hands of a single person, Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) voted against moving forward with the nomination and later said she would oppose Kavanaugh in the final vote. She was the first Republican to break with the party and join most Democrats in opposing Kavanaugh.

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) walks to the Senate floor for a cloture vote on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.
Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) walks to the Senate floor for a cloture vote on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. (Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) told reporters Friday he would vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, “unless something big changes.”

Flake’s decision leaves two senators — Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) — who have not announced how they will vote this weekend. On Friday morning, Flake, Collins and Manchin voted yes on advancing the controversial nomination.

Collins is expected to disclose her final decision in a floor speech at 3 p.m. EDT Friday; Manchin has not indicated when or if he plans to announce his vote in advance.

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President Trump is praising the Senate for pushing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh past a key procedural hurdle.

Trump tweeted Friday: "Very proud of the U.S. Senate for voting "YES" to advance the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh!"

The chamber voted 51-49 to move forward with Trump's nominee. A final vote on Kavanaugh's nomination could occur over the weekend.

Former Vice President Joe Biden accused President Trump’s Republican allies in Congress of choosing “party over country” as he campaigned in Orange County for Democrats running for the U.S. House.

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In a speech highly critical of China’s behavior around the world, Vice President Mike Pence laid out an increasingly confrontational approach to Beijing, signaling tougher actions to come to combat what President Trump sees as a threat to the American economy and his political authority.

Demonstrators protest Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill on Thursday.
Demonstrators protest Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill on Thursday. (Nicholas Kamm)

Capitol Police have begun arresting about 300 demonstrators protesting Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination as they stage a sit-in on the floor of a Senate office building's atrium. 

At a signal from organizers, the group began holding up signs and chanting. Others who were watching on upper floors unfurled banners that said: “We believe Christine Ford.” 

Ford is the California college professor who testified last week at a Senate hearing that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in high school when they were teenagers. Kavanaugh also testified and denied the allegations.