Advertisement
694 posts
  • Russia
The Republican-led House Intelligence Committee must wait a little longer before hearing from Stephen K. Bannon, the former White House chief strategist. (Feb. 6, 2018)

The Republican-led House Intelligence Committee, which has been investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign, must wait a little longer before hearing from Stephen K. Bannon, the former White House chief strategist.

Bannon was expected to testify behind closed doors on Tuesday in response to a subpoena, but he was granted a one-week delay.

That’s around the same time he’s also expected to meet with prosecutors working for special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, who is leading a separate criminal investigation into the Russian meddling and whether anyone in President Trump’s orbit broke the law. 

Advertisement

President Donald Trump's call in the State of the Union address last week for a new era of bipartisan cooperation seems like a distant memory.

Advertisement

Top Trump administration officials and congressional Republicans downplayed Monday’s stock market plunge, saying the economy’s fundamentals were strong even as they acknowledged the gyrations had gained their attention.

Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Burbank), ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee.
Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Burbank), ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee. (Win McNamee / Getty Images)

The House Intelligence Committee voted unanimously Monday night to release a Democratic rebuttal to the GOP's memo on the Russia investigation that President Trump declassified last week.

The document now goes to Trump, who has five days to decide whether to declassify it.

The Democratic document aims to counter the Republican memo, which accuses the FBI and Justice Department of abusing their authority in monitoring a onetime Trump campaign associate.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (Getty Images)

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on Monday left open the possibility of face-to-face talks between U.S. officials traveling with Vice President Mike Pence and North Korean officials on the sidelines of the Olympic Games that start Friday in South Korea.

 "With respect to the vice president's trip to the Olympics and whether or not there would be an opportunity for any kind of a meeting with North Korea, I think we'll just see,” Tillerson said. 

“We'll have to see what happens," he added. When a reporter suggested that meant “No,” he replied, “We'll see, we'll see what happens."

Advertisement
  • White House
  • Economy
(AFP/MANDEL NGAN)

President Trump, unlike his predecessors, bragged repeatedly about stocks as the market rose. Monday, he avoided the topic as they plunged.

During the bull market of the last year, Trump complained that the media weren’t giving him credit for record highs in securities values.

“I mean, it’s something that’s pretty amazing,” he said to a group of mayors last month, in characteristic remarks, citing an estimate of $8 trillion in added wealth.

  • White House
  • Russia
(Jim Lo Scalzo / EPA)

President Trump called Democrats who failed to clap for his State of the Union address last week “un-American.”

Then, somewhat flippantly, he threw out another loaded charge: “Someone said 'treasonous.' I guess, why not? Can we call that treason? Why not?”

Trump’s remarks came during a free-wheeling, highly partisan speech he gave at a factory in Cincinnati on Monday. The speech was billed as official government business, meaning taxpayers footed Trump’s expenses rather than the Republican Party, which is supposed to cover costs when the president is on political business.

  • White House
  • Russia
President Trump accused Rep. Adam Schiff without evidence of illegally leaking “confidential information.”

President Trump flashed anger at one of his leading antagonists in the Russia probe, mocking Rep. Adam Schiff’s personal appearance and accusing him without evidence of illegally leaking “confidential information.”

The attack comes as Schiff (D-Burbank), the ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, continues his efforts to rebut Republican criticism of the investigation into Trump’s associates and their possible ties to Russian meddling in the 2016 election. On Monday, Schiff plans to try to win public release of a Democratic answer to a Republican memo released Friday that attempted to undermine one aspect of the investigation.

In a morning tweet, Trump labeled Schiff “little,” an insult he has used on others, and called him “one of the biggest liars and leakers in Washington, right up there with Comey, Warner, Brennan and Clapper!” 

Advertisement

Jerome H. Powell was formally sworn in Monday as chairman of the Federal Reserve and vowed to remain vigilant about risks to the financial system.

The parents of Otto Warmbier, the U.S. student who died days after being freed from imprisonment in North Korea, react to a standing ovation at the State of the Union on Jan. 30.
The parents of Otto Warmbier, the U.S. student who died days after being freed from imprisonment in North Korea, react to a standing ovation at the State of the Union on Jan. 30. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press)

The father of the U.S. college student who died after being jailed in North Korea will visit South Korea this week to attend the opening ceremonies of the Olympics as a guest of Vice President Mike Pence.

The Washington Post reports that Fred Warmbier's trip coincides with Pence's visit to fight North Korea's propaganda efforts and keep up pressure to halt its nuclear ambitions.

Warmbier's son, Otto, a University of Virginia student from Ohio, was held in North Korean custody for allegedly stealing a propaganda poster. Officials said Otto Warmbier mysteriously suffered brain damage before he was returned to the U.S. last year and died days later.