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President Trump is naming former digital advisor Brad Parscale as campaign manager of his 2020 reelection campaign. 

A person familiar with the announcement confirms Parscale's selection on the condition of anonymity because the person was unauthorized to publicly discuss the news. The conservative Drudge Report website first reported his selection. 

Trump has left little doubt about his intentions to seek reelection. He filed the paperwork to organize his reelection committee on the same day as his inauguration, held his first 2020 campaign rally on Feb. 18 in Florida, and has mused publicly about would-be Democratic challengers. 

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Protesters in Seoul burn an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in January.
Protesters in Seoul burn an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in January. (Associated Press)

The United States’ top diplomat handling the Korean peninsula — a 30-year foreign-policy veteran — has abruptly resigned, citing personal reasons, the State Department said Tuesday.

Joseph Yun, special representative for North Korean policy and regarded a tireless negotiator, informed the State Department of his decision, and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson “reluctantly accepted” the resignation, department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said in a statement.

Nauert said that despite the loss of a key point man, and while there is still no U.S. ambassador to South Korea or confirmed assistant secretary of State for the region, “our diplomatic efforts regarding North Korea will continue based on our maximum pressure campaign to isolate” the government of leader Kim Jong Un.

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White House Communications Director Hope Hicks arrives to testify on Tuesday.
White House Communications Director Hope Hicks arrives to testify on Tuesday. (J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press)

The fractious House Intelligence Committee gathered behind closed doors on Tuesday to interview Hope Hicks, President Trump’s communications director and one of his closest and longest-serving aides.

One likely area of interest: Hicks was reportedly involved in drafting an inaccurate statement for reporters about a meeting between a Russian lawyer offering dirt on Hillary Clinton and top Trump advisors — son Donald Trump Jr., son-in-law Jared Kushner and campaign chief Paul Manafort — during the 2016 campaign. 

It’s unclear how much Hicks will be willing to divulge about her conversations involving the president. Stephen K. Bannon, the former White House strategist, would answer only preselected questions this month and claimed other inquiries would infringe upon executive privilege, referring to the president’s right to protect confidential discussions or material. 

(Associated Press)

President Trump said Monday he might be willing to accept an overture from North Korea to hold talks but only “under the right conditions.”

He acknowledged that a war with the nuclear-armed nation could lead to “tremendous” loss of life, “numbers that nobody has ever even contemplated, never thought of.”

“So they [North Korean officials] want to talk.  First time -- they want to talk. And we'll see what happens,” Trump said at the White House. “We'll see what happens. But something has to be done.”

President Donald Trump told the nation's governors on Monday that he would have rushed in to aid students and teachers during the deadly mass shooting at a Florida high school.

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 Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki in Munich, Germany, earlier this month
Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki in Munich, Germany, earlier this month (AFP / Getty Images)

The top human rights official for the United Nations chose unusually tough language Monday to criticize what he sees as a sharp erosion in civil liberties in Poland and Hungary.

"Xenophobes and racists in Europe are casting off any sense of embarrassment,” said the U.N. high commissioner for human rights, Zeid Ra’ad Hussein, singling out Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban and Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki.

While Hungary and Poland have drawn criticism for antidemocratic actions for some time, two recent statements from their leaders seemed to have provoked Hussein to speak out. Orban, in a speech on Feb. 6, said his country did not want its “color” to be diluted by immigrants. Morawiecki, commenting on a controversial Polish law that criminalizes some language about the Holocaust, spoke of Jewish “perpetrators” along with Nazis — “a disgraceful calumny,” Hussein said.

(Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

President Trump said on Monday that he will take action to limit the sale of so-called “bump stocks” rather than wait to see if Congress does so.

Congress should act, he said, but he added, “I don’t care if Congress does it. I’m writing it out myself, OK?”

Trump’s comments about the devices that can turn legal semi-automatic long guns into virtual machine guns came in remarks to a group of governors gathered at the White House. He had said that their top priority would be to discuss school security in the wake of the deadly school shootings in Parkland, Fla.

(Graphics by Los Angeles Times)

Until the recent downturn, the soaring U.S. stock market had been one of President Trump’s favorite topics.

He’s tweeted more than 60 times since his election about new highs and frequently touted the gains in public comments.

“The stock market is smashing one record after another, and has added more than $7 trillion in new wealth since my election,” he boasted last month to corporate and political leaders in Davos, Switzerland.

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President Trump and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto at a meeting during the G-20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany, in 2017.
President Trump and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto at a meeting during the G-20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany, in 2017. (Saul Loeb / AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto won’t be meeting any time soon, an administration official said Saturday, after the two disagreed sharply over Trump’s continued talk about Mexico paying for a border wall.

“The two leaders agreed now was not the immediate right time for a visit, but that they would have their teams continue to talk and work together,” said the official, who was not authorized to speak by name about the decision.

As first reported by the Washington Post, the two leaders had a testy telephone conversation on Tuesday in which Peña Nieto pushed for a commitment that if he traveled to Washington, Trump would not publicly repeat his call for Mexico to pay for the wall.

Michelle Obama's memoir, one of the most highly anticipated books in recent years, is coming out Nov. 13.