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1213 posts
  • Supreme Court
(J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press)

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says thanks for asking, but she has no plans to retire anytime soon.

She has law clerks on staff through the court’s 2020 term. The earliest she could step down would be in 2021 – when she is 88.

But she said Sunday she doesn’t plan to do that. 

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Democrats have grown used to winning political face-offs over government shutdowns, smiling from the sidelines as Republicans struggled to contain the unruly factions in their party. On Saturday, Democrats got a taste of that stomach-churning game.

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  • White House
  • Congress
Lawmakers were at work at the Capitol on Saturday on the first day of a government shutdown. (J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press)
Lawmakers were at work at the Capitol on Saturday on the first day of a government shutdown. (J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press)

The first day of a federal shutdown ended much as it began Saturday, with Democrats and Republicans hardened in a stalemate of angry finger-pointing as Congress and President Trump failed to broker a deal to reopen the government.

Lawmakers in both parties spent the day blaming each other and pushing plans for new stopgap measures lasting either weeks or days, continuing a tightrope process that went on for months and finally broke down late Friday night.

The White House posted photos of a grim-faced Trump, who had to cancel his plans to attend a Saturday night fundraiser at his Mar-a-Lago beachfront resort in Florida, “working in the White House during the Democratic shutdown” on the first anniversary of his inauguration.

White House budget director Mick Mulvaney, shown in March.
White House budget director Mick Mulvaney, shown in March. (Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)

The White House, seemingly seeking a way out of a shutdown impasse, signaled flexibility Sunday on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

With a partial government shutdown in its second day, Democrats and Republicans have blamed one another, and the “Dreamers,” as DACA beneficiaries are known, have emerged as a key bargaining chip.

White House budget director Mick Mulvaney, interviewed on CNN’s “State of the Union, said President Trump is “absolutely interested and wants to get DACA fixed.”   

(Brian Bennett / Los Angeles Times)

Speaking to U.S. troops involved in bombing Islamic State militants in Syria, Vice President Mike Pence on Sunday launched a broadside at Democrats over the government shutdown, accusing the opposition party of “playing politics with military pay.” 

It is unusual for a sitting vice president to use a meet-and-greet with service members to make political attacks.

“Despite bipartisan support for a budget resolution, the minority in the Senate has decided to play politics with military pay. But you deserve better,” Pence told a crowd of Air Force and Army troops inside an airplane hanger on a military base near the Syrian border.

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Jordan's King Abdullah II, right, speaks across a table to U.S. Vice President Mike Pence during a lunch at the royal palace in Amman.
Jordan's King Abdullah II, right, speaks across a table to U.S. Vice President Mike Pence during a lunch at the royal palace in Amman. (Khalil Mazraawi / Agence-France Presse)

Vice President Mike Pence heard pointed criticism Sunday from the king of Jordan, a key regional ally unhappy with President Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

Sitting directly across from the vice president at the start of a lunch in the royal palace on a hilltop in Amman, King Abdullah II told Pence he had repeatedly voiced his “concerns” to the White House over the past year that such a move would upend peace negotiations and threaten Jordan’s stability.

“Today we have a major challenge to overcome, especially with some of the rising frustrations,” Abdullah said.

Vice President Mike Pence prepares to address March for Life participants from the Rose Garden.
Vice President Mike Pence prepares to address March for Life participants from the Rose Garden. (Scalzo / EPA / Shutterstock)

En route to Cairo for a Mideast tour, Vice President Mike Pence shook hands and chatted with U.S. service members Saturday during a stop to refuel Air Force Two at Shannon Airport in Ireland.

Pence will visit three Middle East nations. 

As the vice president took photos with some of the troops, he brought up the U.S. government shutdown, which began at midnight Friday. 

(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

More than 5,000 people are expected to converge at the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool in Washington for the city’s Women’s March on Saturday. Despite the fact that the land is overseen by the National Park Service – an agency affected by the 2013 government shutdown — the march will continue.

The park service previously put a plan in place that restricted a government shutdown from affecting activities protected by the 1st Amendment. The Women’s March falls under that description.

The Times will be covering anniversary events this weekend. Follow coverage here.

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(Alex Wong / Getty Images)

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders issued this statement as the clock struck midnight and the federal government began shutting down when the Senate failed to pass a funding measure:

“Senate Democrats own the Schumer Shutdown. Tonight, they put politics above our national security, military families, vulnerable children, and our country’s ability to serve all Americans. We will not negotiate the status of unlawful immigrants while Democrats hold our lawful citizens hostage over their reckless demands,” Sanders said.

“This is the behavior of obstructionist losers, not legislators. When Democrats start paying our armed forces and first responders we will reopen negotiations on immigration reform,” she said. “During this politically manufactured Schumer Shutdown, the President and his Administration will fight for and protect the American people.”