Advertisement
1213 posts
(Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Nearly a week after horrific mudslides hit California’s Central Coast and killed at least 20 people, President Trump sent his condolences to those affected in his first public statement on the disaster.

The two-sentence statement was released by the White House press secretary on Monday.

“The President has been briefed and will continue to monitor the mudslides in California. The President and First Lady extend their deepest sympathies to the families affected, their appreciation for the first responders saving lives, and their prayers for those who remain missing.”

Advertisement
  • White House

Sen. Richard J. Durbin is standing by his claim that President Trump questioned why the country has to accept immigrants from “shithole” African countries, after two Republican colleagues belatedly refuted the Illinois Democrat.

“I know what happened. I stand behind every word that I said in terms of that meeting,” Durbin said on Monday about the president’s remarks at a White House meeting last week on immigration.

Durbin also dismissed reports attributed to unnamed White House aides that Trump said “shithouse” rather than “shithole.” He told reporters in Illinois, “I am stunned that this is their defense.”

Advertisement
Sen. David Perdue walks to the elevator for a meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower, in New York on Dec. 2, 2016.
Sen. David Perdue walks to the elevator for a meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower, in New York on Dec. 2, 2016. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

A Republican senator is insisting that President Trump did not use a vulgar term in referring to African countries during a closed-door meeting on immigration that he and six other lawmakers attended last week.

Sen. David Perdue of Georgia called reports describing Trump as using vile language in the meeting a “gross misrepresentation” and said Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.)  Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) were mistaken in indicating that was the case.

Perdue said Sunday on ABC's “This Week”: “I am telling you that he did not use that word. And I'm telling you it's a gross misrepresentation.”

(Wong Maye-E; Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press)

President Trump is disputing a quote attributed to him during a newspaper interview about relations with North Korea's leader.

The Wall Street Journal on Thursday quoted Trump as saying: “I probably have a very good relationship with Kim Jong Un.”

Trump tweeted Sunday: “The Wall Street Journal stated falsely that I said to them ‘I have a good relationship with Kim Jong Un’ (of N. Korea). Obviously I didn't say that. I said ‘I'd have a good relationship with Kim Jong Un,' a big difference. Fortunately we now record conversations with reporters and they knew exactly what I said and meant. They just wanted a story. FAKE NEWS!”

  • White House
  • Congress
  • Immigration
President Trump speaks during a retreat with Republican lawmakers at Camp David this month. (Saul Loeb / AFP/Getty Images)
President Trump speaks during a retreat with Republican lawmakers at Camp David this month. (Saul Loeb / AFP/Getty Images)

The furor over President Trump’s language about immigrants from “shithole countries” has partially obscured the substance of what he was demanding and the profound shift among Republicans beyond opposing illegal immigration to also pushing new limits on legal migrants, particularly those of color.

Trump made the remark as he rejected a bipartisan proposal from Sens. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.) and Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) to resolve the status of some 700,000 so-called Dreamers facing deportation. In exchange for protecting them, Trump wanted more restrictions on legal migrants from Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America, among other changes.

Those demands come as Trump has already put the country on track to remove 1 million immigrants over the next two years. Among them are the Dreamers — young immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children — and more than 200,000 Salvadorans, nearly 60,000 Haitians and others from Central America who have lived in the U.S. legally, in some cases for decades, under temporary protected status plans that the administration is ending.

Advertisement
Chelsea Manning
Chelsea Manning (Andy Kropa / Associated Press)

Chelsea Manning is running for the U.S. Senate in Maryland.

The transgender former Army soldier who was convicted of leaking classified documents filed her statement of candidacy with the Federal Election Commission on Thursday.

The Washington Post reported Saturday that Manning will challenge Democrat Ben Cardin. He has served two terms and is an overwhelming favorite to win.

Michael Cohen, President Trump's personal lawyer, brokered a $130,000 payment to an adult film actress to prevent her from publicly discussing an alleged sexual encounter with Trump, the Wall Street Journal reported.
Michael Cohen, President Trump's personal lawyer, brokered a $130,000 payment to an adult film actress to prevent her from publicly discussing an alleged sexual encounter with Trump, the Wall Street Journal reported. (Associated Press)

President Trump’s personal lawyer brokered a $130,000 payment to a porn actress to prevent her from publicly discussing an alleged sexual encounter with Trump, according to a report Friday in the Wall Street Journal.

Trump met Stephanie Clifford, whose goes by the name Stormy Daniels in films, at a golf event in 2006, a year after Trump's marriage to his wife, Melania, according to the the Journal. Clifford began talking with ABC News in the fall of 2016 for a story involving an alleged relationship with Trump, but reached a $130,000 deal a month before the election, which prevented her from going public, the newspaper said.

Trump's longtime attorney Michael Cohen arranged for the payment through Clifford's lawyer, Keith Davidson, the Journal reported.

For Joe Arpaio, it’s as if he never left.

On Saturday, in his first public appearance since he announced his candidacy for a Senate seat here, Arpaio attended a gathering of Maricopa County Republicans.

“You’re loved, Joe,” said a woman, placing both hands on his cheeks.

Advertisement
  • White House
  • Congress
  • Immigration

Two Republican senators who hastily joined an immigration meeting at the White House this week said Friday they do not recall President Trump using vulgar language to describe countries in Africa and elsewhere.

The White House has not disputed reports that Trump complained about immigrants from “shithole” countries during the meeting.

Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Ill.) said Friday that Trump definitely made the remark, and two Republican senators said they had been told about it by others in the meeting. 

  • White House
  • Immigration
Illinois Sen. Richard Durbin, the Senate’s second-ranking Democrat, said President Trump “said things which were hate-filled, vile and racist” during a meeting on Thursday .

Illinois Sen. Richard Durbin, the Senate’s second-ranking Democrat, said President Trump “said things which were hate-filled, vile and racist” during a meeting on Thursday with a bipartisan group of lawmakers, refuting Trump’s denials that he slurred immigrants from what Trump called “shithole” countries.

“I cannot believe that in the history of the White House, in that Oval Office, any president has ever spoken words that I personally heard our president speak yesterday,” Durbin told reporters on Friday, after Trump tweeted a denial of sorts.

“I’ve seen the comments in the press,” Durbin continued, referring to reports about the White House meeting that he attended. “I have not read one of them that’s inaccurate.”