Advertisement

Stew of quick duck confit and fresh fava beans

Time 1 hour
Yields Serves 6
Stew of quick duck confit and fresh fava beans
(Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
1

About 4 to 5 hours before serving, remove the duck confit from the refrigerator. Shuck the fava beans and discard the pods. Drop into boiling water; allow the water to return to a boil and drain the favas. Rinse under cool water; peel off the skins. Cool, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate.

2

About 1 to 2 hours before serving, scrape off any congealed fat from the duck confit. Place the duck skin-side up in a 12-inch nonstick skillet; cover and fry over medium heat until lightly browned and crisp, about 5 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Carefully remove the duck skin and return it to the skillet to render any remaining fat. Drain the skin. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the fat from the skillet. Cover the duck and skin with foil to prevent drying out.

3

Add the shallots and salt pork to the skillet. Cover and cook over low heat for 5 minutes. Uncover and continue cooking until the pork and shallots are light brown around the edges. Add the artichoke slices, fennel and sugar and cook 2 minutes, stirring. Over high heat, deglaze with one-fourth cup of water and reduce slightly. Remove from the heat. (Recipe can be made to this point 1 to 2 hours ahead. Set the skillet, uncovered, in a cool place.)

4

About 10 minutes before serving, preheat the broiler. Meanwhile, add the stock and favas to the skillet and bring to a boil. Cover tightly, reduce the heat and cook until the favas are fully cooked, 4 to 5 minutes. Salt and pepper to taste.

5

Put the duck on a broiler pan. Replace the skin on each piece, crisp-side up and dab with the oil. Heat the duck under the broiler and crisp the skin, about 1 to 1 1/2 minutes. Arrange in a deep, warm serving dish and pour the favas over. Sprinkle with the parsley and thyme. Serve at once.

Adapted from “Paula Wolfert’s World of Food.”.

Russ Parsons is a former food writer and columnist at the Los Angeles Times.
Newsletter
Get our new Cooking newsletter, coming soon.
You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.