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Students from Florida's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School hug survivors of the Pulse nightclub shooting before heading to a rally.
Students from Florida's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School hug survivors of the Pulse nightclub shooting before heading to a rally. (Gerald Herbert / Associated Press)

President Trump said Friday that the Florida sheriff’s deputy who failed to intervene in last week’s school shooting may have been a “coward,” a strong rebuke from a president toward a local law officer.

“He trained his whole life,” Trump told reporters at the White House, referring to Scot Peterson, who resigned after Broward County authorities determined he’d stood outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School for four minutes during the shooting that left 17 people dead.

“When it came time to get in there and do something, he didn’t have the courage or something happened,” Trump added. “But he certainly did a poor job. There’s no question about that.”

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  • White House
  • North Korea
(Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

President Trump is announcing what he calls the “largest ever” sanctions against North Korea.

In a speech to conservative activists Friday morning, Trump will describe sanctions to target 56 vessels, shipping companies and trade businesses the administration thinks are helping North Korea evade existing sanctions, according to excerpts of the speech released ahead of time.

The administration is hoping the sanctions will halt North Korea’s nuclear program, a strategy that so far has failed to thwart the progress of supreme leader Kim Jong Un’s regime toward developing a nuclear-armed ballistic missile capable of hitting U.S. territory.

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Tourists ride the Staten Island Ferry to get a view of the Statue of Liberty in New York City.
Tourists ride the Staten Island Ferry to get a view of the Statue of Liberty in New York City. (Mark Lennihan / Associated Press)

America is no longer a “nation of immigrants,” at least in the mission statement of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Director L. Francis Cissna announced the rewrite of the statement Thursday, scrapping the more immigration-friendly language that said the agency “secures America’s promise as a nation of immigrants by providing accurate and useful information to our customers.”

The new version has a distinctly tougher tone, stressing the agency’s role as “protecting Americans, securing the homeland, and honoring our values.”

Paul Manafort
Paul Manafort (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III filed a vastly expanded criminal indictment against President Trump’s former campaign manager and his partner on Thursday, more than doubling the number of charges they face. 

Paul W. Manafort Jr. and Richard J. Gates III were first charged with 12 counts on Oct. 30. Both pleaded not guilty, although Gates is expected to plead guilty and testify against Manafort. 

The new, superseding indictment includes 16 counts related to false individual income tax returns, seven counts of failure to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts. five counts of bank fraud conspiracy and four counts of bank fraud. 

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For days now, the airwaves and social media have been filled with the voices of young people, thick with righteousness and anger, vowing never again.

  • White House
President Trump, during a meeting on school safety on Wednesday.
President Trump, during a meeting on school safety on Wednesday. (Carolyn Kaster/Associated Press)

President Trump on Thursday lambasted California officials for how they are dealing with gangs and threatened to pull immigration and border agents out of the state to show just how bad things would be without federal help.

Federal agents are working to defeat gangs like MS-13, the president said, but the gang members “come in, they’re smart, they actually have franchises going to Los Angeles. No help from the state of California.”

He continued: “I mean, frankly, if I wanted to pull our people from California, you would have a crime mess like you've never seen in California.”

President Trump met at the White House on Wednesday with Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students and others touched by gun violence.
President Trump met at the White House on Wednesday with Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students and others touched by gun violence. (Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

As President Trump has waded into gun policy in the days since the latest massacre, he appears to be consulting with members of Congress and the National Rifle Assn.

Going into a meeting on school safety with state and local officials on Thursday at the White House, Trump told reporters that he senses a broad willingness to make changes to reduce gun violence.

"I'm the biggest believer in the 2nd Amendment," he said. But Trump said he has spoken with NRA officials and, “The NRA is ready to do things. People like to blame them." 

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The NRA's Wayne LaPierre speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Feb. 22.
The NRA's Wayne LaPierre speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Feb. 22. (Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press)

Leaders of the National Rifle Assn. on Thursday accused supporters of gun control of exploiting the mass school shooting in Florida to promote an anti-gun agenda. 

NRA leader Wayne LaPierre spoke at the Conservative Political Action Conference. He said Democrats such as House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of San Francisco and Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy are eager to blame the NRA for the Florida shooting and are calling “for even more government control.” 

He said opponents of gun rights want to “sweep under the carpet” the failure of school safety, families “and even the unbelievable failure of the FBI” to prevent such shootings. 

Vice President Mike Pence said on Thursday that the Trump administration is making school safety the “top national priority” as it responds to the deadly mass shooting at a Parkland, Fla., high school.

“As the president has said, no child, no teacher should ever be in danger in an American school,” Pence told the annual gathering of the Conservative Political Action Conference, known as CPAC.

Trump was meeting at the White House with state and local government officials about school safety. Pence noted that the president later this week also will talk to state governors coming to Washington for their annual winter meeting.