Advertisement
California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra warned businesses Thursday that they cannot voluntarily give information on employees to immigration agents.
California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra warned businesses Thursday that they cannot voluntarily give information on employees to immigration agents. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

Concerned about “rumors” of an imminent immigration enforcement sweep in California, state Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra on Thursday warned employers he is prepared to seek fines if they violate a new state law that prohibits them from giving information on employees to federal authorities.

Becerra said rumblings of possible sweeps compelled him to remind Californians that there are new laws restricting local law enforcement cooperation with federal agents and that bar businesses from voluntarily allowing immigration officers to access or obtain employee records without a court order or subpoena.

“It’s important, given these rumors out there, to let people and more specifically employers know that if they voluntarily start giving up information about their employees in ways that contradict our new California laws they subject themselves to actions by my office … enforcing AB 450,” he said at a news conference.

Democratic candidates debate in the 49th Congressional District in San Juan Capistrano on Feb. 20.
Democratic candidates debate in the 49th Congressional District in San Juan Capistrano on Feb. 20. (Javier Panzar / Los Angeles Times)

Five Democrats looking to replace retiring Republican Rep. Darrell Issa squared off at a debate in San Juan Capistrano on Tuesday night, struggling to differentiate themselves in a crowded and open race.

At least nine candidates are running in the primary and for most of the evening the five Democrats agreed on the issues, from opposing new toll lanes in the district to embracing the need for more gun control.

One touchy topic caused a rift: Would the candidates vote for Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi to become Speaker if Democrats win control of the House?

Advertisement
  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
Rachel Payne is running in Orange County.
Rachel Payne is running in Orange County. (Rachel Payne for Congress)

Abortion-rights group Emily’s List has thrown its weight behind two more Democrats challenging GOP incumbents in California.

The group announced Wednesday that it’s endorsing Rachel Payne’s candidacy against Rep. Dana Rohrabacher in Orange County, and Virginia Madueño in the race to unseat Rep. Jeff Denham in the Central Valley.

In a statement announcing the endorsements, President Stephanie Schriock highlighted Madueño’s background as a small town mayor and business owner, and Payne’s leadership in the tech industry.

Advertisement
  • California Legislature
  • Sexual harassment
Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia)
Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia) (Steve Yeater)

State Sen. Tony Mendoza “more likely than not” behaved in a flirtatious or sexually suggestive manner toward staffers, a Senate investigation found.

The four-page summary report released late Tuesday afternoon described the findings by two outside law firms tasked with investigating allegations that Mendoza had made unwanted advances to female aides while he served as an Assembly member from 2006 to 2012 and as a senator from 2014 to the present.

Investigators spoke to 47 witnesses, including Mendoza, who was interviewed twice, according to the report.

  • California in Congress
(Michael Reynolds / EPA/Shutterstock)

Sen. Dianne Feinstein is urging President Trump to back her gun-control legislation rather than have the administration try to do it alone.

Feinstein, the original author of the nation's assault weapons ban, proposed legislation to ban devices that make semiautomatic weapons work more like automatic weapons after 59 people were killed and more than 500 others were injured at a Las Vegas country music festival, but the measure stalled soon after she put it forward.

Construction workers building homes in Echo Park.
Construction workers building homes in Echo Park. (Los Angeles Times)

Those who want to blame a California environmental law for the state’s housing problems should instead point their fingers at cities and counties, according to a new report from researchers at UC Berkeley and Columbia University.

The California Environmental Quality Act, or CEQA, a 1970 state law, requires developers to analyze and eliminate a project’s effect on the environment before building. While often praised for preservation, CEQA is a continual target for those who argue the law blocks needed housing.  

The real problem isn’t CEQA, but rather how local governments approve projects, the report said. CEQA only comes into play if a city or county decides to review housing developments individually. If a local government relies on zoning or other processes to determine whether a particular project gets built, developers don’t have to go through the CEQA process.

Advertisement
  • 2018 election
  • California Democrats
  • U.S. Senate race
(Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)

California Democratic Party delegates received a mailer on Tuesday from Sen. Dianne Feinstein asking for their support in the endorsement race at the state party’s convention this weekend.

“Today, more than ever, California and our nation’s progress are threatened on many fronts by Donald Trump and the Republicans in Congress,” Feinstein wrote. “… California Democrats can and must lead Democrats across the nation to victory. Please know that I stand with each and every one of you and that I deeply appreciate all you do for our party and for the values we share.”

The mailer also touts Feinstein’s endorsement by scores of California political leaders, including Sen. Kamala Harris, House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi of San Francisco, Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.

  • California Legislature
California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra
California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra on Tuesday said he would not appeal a state appellate court ruling that granted a new bail hearing for a San Francisco man accused of stealing cologne, paving the way for a change to the way judges across the state award bail.

The announcement comes after Gov. Jerry Brown pledged last year to work with state lawmakers and the state’s chief justice, Tani Cantil-Sakauye, on overhauling California’s bail system. 

El Cajon Mayor Bill Wells announced Tuesday he is running for Congress, challenging long-time Republican incumbent Rep. Duncan Hunter for a hotly-contested district that encompasses much of East County.

Wells, who has held the mayoral position since 2013, is seeking to take over the 50th Congressional District, which serves more than 730,000 constituents, including those in the North County communities of Fallbrook, San Marcos, Valley Center and Escondido.

Advertisement