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  • California Legislature
(Don Leach / Daily Pilot)

Surfing could become the official state sport of California under a proposal from a Los Angeles-area lawmaker.

The legislation, Assembly Bill 1782, would declare surfing California’s official sport because the state is home to world-famous surf breaks, including Malibu, Trestles, Mavericks, Rincon, Steamer Lane and Huntington and has a long history of hosting major international surfing events.

“Nothing represents the California Dream better than surfing — riding the waves and living in harmony with the beautiful beaches and ocean of our Golden State,” said Assemblyman Al Muratsuchi (D-Torrance), the bill’s author, said in a statement.

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  • California Legislature
(Don Leach / Daily Pilot)

Surfing could become the official state sport of California under a proposal from a Los Angeles-area lawmaker.

The legislation, Assembly Bill 1782, would declare surfing California’s official sport because the state is home to world-famous surf breaks, including Malibu, Trestles, Mavericks, Rincon, Steamer Lane and Huntington and has a long history of hosting major international surfing events.

“Nothing represents the California Dream better than surfing — riding the waves and living in harmony with the beautiful beaches and ocean of our Golden State,” said Assemblyman Al Muratsuchi (D-Torrance), the bill’s author, said in a statement.

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  • State government
Voters hold signs demonstrating their support for legislation that would allow California communities to expand rent control
Voters hold signs demonstrating their support for legislation that would allow California communities to expand rent control (Kathleen Ronayne / Associated Press)

Last week, hundreds of landlords and tenants packed the state Capitol to debate the future of rent control in California.

Legislation, Assembly Bill 1506, that would have allowed for the expansion of rent control politics across the state died after a four-hour committee hearing. This week’s “Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Pod,” we talk about why the measure failed and a possible November statewide ballot measure that also could increase rent control.

We interview Assemblyman David Chiu (D-San Francisco), the chairman of the committee that debated the measure, about his ideal rent control policies and what lawmakers are planning to do next to address the state’s housing problems.

University of California President Janet Napolitano and other college and state officials pledge to help Dreamers.
University of California President Janet Napolitano and other college and state officials pledge to help Dreamers. (Jazmine Ulloa / Los Angeles Times)

California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra, University of California President Janet Napolitano and other state college officials on Wednesday urged students to renew their DACA status after a federal judge last week halted the Trump administration’s plan to end the program. 

“We stand with our DACA students,” Napolitano told reporters in Sacramento. “They have been raised in this country. They know this country as home.”

Under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, about 800,000 young people who came to the U.S. illegally as children have been allowed to live and work legally in the country. The Trump administration decided to end the Obama-era program last year, but a federal judge in San Francisco reinstated it last week, siding with Becerra and his counterparts in the other states in a lawsuit against the decision.

  • State government
  • 2018 election
(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Californians who renew their driver's license by mail will soon be able to use that same document to become a voter, after state officials settled a federal voting rights lawsuit.

The lawsuit filed last May alleged that California was required to integrate voter registration into forms the state Department of Motor Vehicles uses to issue a license or update an address. While the agency made changes to its online and paper applications in 2016, it did not include voter registration on license renewals.

“The freedom to vote is the most critical component of our nation’s democracy and difficulty registering is one of the greatest barriers to exercising that freedom,” Michael Risher, a senior staff attorney with the ACLU of Northern California, said Wednesday.

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  • State government
  • 2018 election
(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Californians who renew their driver's license by mail will soon be able to use that same document to become a voter, after state officials settled a federal voting rights lawsuit.

The lawsuit filed last May alleged that California was required to integrate voter registration into forms the state Department of Motor Vehicles uses to issue a license or update an address. While the agency made changes to its online and paper applications in 2016, it did not include voter registration on license renewals.

“The freedom to vote is the most critical component of our nation’s democracy and difficulty registering is one of the greatest barriers to exercising that freedom,” Michael Risher, a senior staff attorney with the ACLU of Northern California, said Wednesday.

  • California in Congress
(Michael Reynolds / EPA / Shutterstock)

After years of tangling with California Sen. Dianne Feinstein, civil liberties activists seemed to have her onboard with their fight to curtail the vast warrantless surveillance program exposed by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

They were optimistic Tuesday when she headed into a major vote over whether to impose new restrictions on the government monitoring.

But after a spirited nail-biter of a floor fight, Feinstein broke with privacy advocates from the right and left to cast a crucial vote in favor of leaving the program largely unchanged for the next six years.

  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Democrats

Latino voters in California strongly support Antonio Villaraigosa in the governor’s race, but a significant number remain undecided, according to a new poll released Wednesday.

Villaraigosa, the former mayor of Los Angeles, was backed by 31% of Latino registered voters in a Latino Community Foundation poll, while Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom was backed by 14%. The rest of the candidates polled in the low single digits. The greatest number of respondents, 36%, said they were undecided.

The poll of 900 Latino registered voters was conducted by landline and cellphone calls and online between Jan. 6-14, and has a margin of error of 3.3 points in either direction. Conducted by the consulting group Latino Decisions, the survey will be released publicly later Wednesday.

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  • California Legislature
Several hundred people in Sacramento marched in support of a single-payer healthcare system on May 19, 2017.
Several hundred people in Sacramento marched in support of a single-payer healthcare system on May 19, 2017. (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)

The political battle lines over single-payer healthcare in California are growing starker, with an alliance of doctors, dentists, nurse practitioners and other health providers ramping up their opposition to the proposal.

In a letter to legislators, the coalition, unveiled Wednesday, blasted Senate Bill 562 as a proposal that “would dismantle the healthcare marketplace and destabilize California’s economy.”

The emergence of heavy-hitting healthcare groups such as the California Medical Assn., the California Dental Assn. and the California Pharmacists Assn. signals an escalation in the opposition to the legislation, under which the state would foot the bill for nearly all medical expenses of its residents. Up until now, the measure was primarily opposed by health plans and business groups. One member of the new coalition, Kaiser Permanente, has been vocal in its opposition to the bill for months, but the group’s other members have so far been muted in their criticism.

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

At the start of what’s expected to be a contentious week in Congress, dozens of Californians brought to the country illegally as children gathered on Capitol Hill to pressure lawmakers to find a solution for their immigration status.

Joining them was state Senate leader Kevin de León. He plans to meet with the state’s House members and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, whom De León is challenging in this year’s election.

“Time is running out and our patience is long gone,” De León said at a news conference Tuesday morning. “If you truly reject the bigotry of this administration and want what’s best for this country ... secure the future of these Americans.”