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426 posts
  • Trump
  • We're All Doomed
  • The Swamp
Emails reveal that the Trump administration lied about why it wanted a citizenship question added to the 2020 Census.
Emails reveal that the Trump administration lied about why it wanted a citizenship question added to the 2020 Census. (Jabin Botsford / Washington Post)

When the Commerce Department first floated the idea of adding a citizenship question to the 2020 Census, it couched it in altruistic terms. The most anti-immigrant administration in modern American history, and the most indifferent (to put it mildly) to racial discrimination, said the Justice Department wanted the question added to collect data it could use to better enforce the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Bull, said critics, including The Times Editorial Board, which described the proffered reasoning as a “dubious explanation.”

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  • Opinion

Facebook's battle against fake news is off to a rocky start. Days after Mark Zuckerberg was publicly flogged for saying Holocaust denialism wouldn't be removed from the platform, radio host Alex Jones created another PR nightmare for the company by using its platform to say Robert S. Mueller III is involved with pedophilia, before pantomiming shooting him "politically."

A taste of Jones’ rant:

"Everyone's so scared of Mueller. They'd let Mueller rape kids in front of people, which he did. I mean, Mueller is a monster, man. God, imagine. He's even above the pedophiles, though. The word is he doesn't have sex with kids. He just controls it all.”

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  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • We're All Doomed
  • Rule of Law
President Trump's verbal assaults have turned his fellow Republicans against the FBI.
President Trump's verbal assaults have turned his fellow Republicans against the FBI. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press)

It can be hard sometimes to measure the corrosive effects of President Trump’s continuous assaults on American institutions, from the media to the courts to the government he runs. Discourse has coarsened, facts are ignored and truth is relative.

To quote the band Drive-By Truckers, “We're standing on the precipice of prejudice and fear / We trust science just as long as it tells us what we want to hear / We want our truths all fair and balanced as long as our notions lie within it.”

  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • The Witch Hunt
President Trump arrives at Kansas City International Airport to attend the national convention of the Veterans of Foreign Wars on Tuesday.
President Trump arrives at Kansas City International Airport to attend the national convention of the Veterans of Foreign Wars on Tuesday. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

Even when he’s trying to spin the Russia story against his political opponents, President Trump can’t bring himself to acknowledge the reality of what his BFF Vladimir Putin has been doing. En route to the Veterans of Foreign Wars’ national convention (and a fundraiser) in Kansas City, Mo., the president tweeted:

I suspect that a long line of presidents would dispute Trump’s “tougher on Russia” claim, particularly Ronald Reagan. And no matter what Trump tweets today, he can’t erase the words of his Russian presidential counterpart in Helsinki last week.

When asked whether he wanted Trump to win the 2016 election, Putin replied, “Yes, I did. Yes, I did. Because he talked about bringing the U.S.-Russia relationship back to normal.” (Putin apparently ignored the second half of the question, which was whether he directed any Russian officials to help Trump prevail.)

  • Opinion
  • Guns and Ammo
Mourners visit a memorial to a shooting victim at the Silver Lake Trader Joe's -- part of the nation's daily drumbeat of gun violence.
Mourners visit a memorial to a shooting victim at the Silver Lake Trader Joe's -- part of the nation's daily drumbeat of gun violence. (Los Angeles Times)

Today is my first day back at work after more than two weeks of vacation — my time off started July 4, fittingly enough (a few weeks of independence beginning on Independence Day). The news, of course, doesn’t go on holiday when we do (nor, evidently, do President Trump’s efforts to destabilize everything he comes in contact with).

Now that I’m back, I thought I’d check in with the Gun Violence Archive to see whether gun violence took a holiday too. It didn’t, of course. Our fellow Americans continued to kill themselves and others with abandon, from toddlers shooting siblings to violent criminals killing police officers.

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  • Trump
  • Opinion
Cattle are prepared for showing at the Iowa County Fair in Marengo, Iowa, on July 12.
Cattle are prepared for showing at the Iowa County Fair in Marengo, Iowa, on July 12. (Scott Olson / Getty Images)

It doesn’t take a degree in economics to suspect that making something more expensive will put a crimp in its sales. That might not be true for a Ferrari or a Picasso, but it’s certainly the case for a commoditized item that has many potential substitutes.

Like, say, the cuts of beef coming out of U.S. factory farms. Or the chicken breasts. Or the pork chops.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the nascent trade war that President Trump has ignited with the rest of the world is already having an effect on U.S. meat producers. That’s because as the administration slaps tariffs on foreign steel, aluminum and other products, our trading partners are slapping retaliatory tariffs on our top exports, most notably agricultural goods.

  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • Rule of Law
Part of Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, which President Trump wants to slash in half.
Part of Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, which President Trump wants to slash in half. (Douglas C. Pizac)

Three months into his reign of error, President Trump ordered a review of more than two dozen national monuments — federal land excluded from various uses — with an eye toward reducing the amount of protected land and loosening the management plans covering what activities would be allowed where. Environmentalists (and The Times editorial board) warned that Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s subsequent analysis and recommendations seemed framed more by a desire to increase exploitation of public lands than by a desire to preserve them. And now an errant release of internal emails shows the environmentalists were right.

The Washington Post reports that Interior officials, responding to Freedom of Information Act requests, mistakenly sent journalists and activists thousands of pages of internal emails that reveal government officials cherry-picked data to justify reducing the scope of some monuments while ignoring 99% of 2.7 million public comments against changing the designations. The president ultimately reduced the 1.35 million acre Bears Ears National Monument, designated by President Obama in 2016, by 85%, and the 1.7 million acre Grand-Staircase-Escalante, designated by President Clinton in 1996, by about half. Other proposals are still on the president’s desk, though there has been little indication whether he intends to act on them.

  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • We're All Doomed
President Trump, left, on July 22, and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani on Feb. 6.
President Trump, left, on July 22, and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani on Feb. 6. (AP Photo)

President Trump drew a red line of sorts with Iran on Twitter late Sunday night, echoing the belligerence of his early tweets about North Korea.

Trump was responding to a speech by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, whose remarks to Iranian diplomats on Sunday were reported (not in shoutcaps) by the Iranian government news agency. And as was the case with North Korea, Rouhani wasn’t threatening unilateral action against the United States — he was telling Trump that there would be a high price to pay if the United States messed with Iran.

Here’s the money quote from Rouhani, per Reuters: “America should know that peace with Iran is the mother of all peace, and war with Iran is the mother of all wars.”

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  • Opinion
  • Rule of Law
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) wants to see documents from Brett Kavanaugh's time in the White House.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) wants to see documents from Brett Kavanaugh's time in the White House. (Jose Luis Magana / Associated Press)

After President George W. Bush nominated John G. Roberts Jr. to the Supreme Court — initially as an associate justice, later as chief justice — reporters pored over musty documents from his days as a lawyer in Ronald Reagan’s administration. I was among them.

In an article in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on July 28, 2005, I analyzed papers from Roberts’  time as a special assistant to Atty Gen. William French Smith. They suggested that when the  young lawyer joined the administration he was “a true believer in Reagan’s views about the need for judicial restraint.”

Almost 13 years later, it’s Judge Brett Kavanaugh who is up for confirmation to the high court, and Senate Democrats are insisting on spelunking through records of his time in the Bush White House.

Sen. Kamala Harris speaks with Senate Democrats in front of the Supreme Court on July 10.
Sen. Kamala Harris speaks with Senate Democrats in front of the Supreme Court on July 10. (Al Drago / Getty Images)

With the cost of rent hitting record highs in California and many big cities across the country, U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) proposed this week one possible way to ease the burden on renters: a tax credit.

Harris unveiled The Rent Relief Act, which would create a refundable tax credit for tenants paying more than 30% of their gross income on their rent and utilities. The credit would be limited to households earning less than $100,000 (or $125,000 in high-cost areas like California’s urban centers) and would cap the amount of rent that could be claimed.

People who spend a third of their income on housing costs are considered “rent burdened,” and they may not have enough money left each month for other necessities, such as transportation, food, healthcare or savings.