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675 posts
  • California Legislature
  • California Democrats
Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia (D-Bell Gardens)
Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia (D-Bell Gardens) (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

An admission by Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia that she likely used a homophobic term to refer to a gay legislative leader has prompted rebukes from her fellow Democrats.

Garcia (D-Bell Gardens) acknowledged in an interview with KQED that she had used the word “homo” to describe gay people and did not dispute an allegation that she used the term to describe former Assembly Speaker John A. Pérez, the state’s first openly gay speaker. She denied using other homophobic slurs.

“Have I at some point used the word 'homo'? Yeah I've used that word 'homo,'” Garcia said. “I don't know that I've used it in derogatory context.”

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  • 2018 election
  • California Democrats
  • U.S. Senate race
Sen. Dianne Feinstein
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (Jeff Chiu / Associated Press)

Prominent female Democratic senators from across the country plan to visit Los Angeles for a star-studded fundraiser during a three-city West Coast swing, according to an invitation obtained by The Times.

The April 20 reception, at the home of Hollywood philanthropists Leslie and Cliff Gilbert-Lurie, will be headlined by Sens. Dianne Feinstein of California, Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada, Maria Cantwell of Washington, Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire, Mazie Hirono of Hawaii and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, as well as Rep. Jacky Rosen of Nevada, who is running for a Senate seat.

The hosts include actresses Jane Fonda and Connie Britton, television producer Marcy Carsey, former L.A. city controller Wendy Greuel, prominent Democratic donor Elizabeth Hirsh Naftali and others.

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When Ace Smith was a boy he dreamed, like many, of growing up to be a Major League Baseball player. A power-hitting catcher, to be precise.

Governor's Debate: Five of the candidates for governor square off live from USC Sol Price School of Public Policy. NBC4's Conan Nolan and Colleen Williams co-moderate. http://4.nbcla.com/eZWjRAw

Posted by NBC LA on Monday, March 26, 2018

California gubernatorial candidates blasted front-runner Gavin Newsom on Monday for skipping a televised debate in Los Angeles in order to attend a fundraiser.

“Thank you for caring enough about this state to be here,” former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa told the audience in his opening statement. “I respect you for that. That’s why I showed up.”

State Treasurer John Chiang called it “sad” that Newsom didn’t attend the debate at the University of Southern California.

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California's June 5 primary will set the course for which congressional districts will be battlegrounds — or missed opportunities — this fall. With just over two months to go, we've updated our rankings of the most competitive contests in the state. The stakes in the midterm elections couldn't be higher: control of the U.S. House. Democrats consider 10 Republican-held districts here to be battlegrounds and can't win the House without winning at least a few of them.

Former state Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia).
Former state Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia). (Steve Yeater / Associated Press)

The California secretary of state has rejected Tony Mendoza’s proposed ballot designation of “state senator” in the June election, saying it is deceptive because he resigned from the Senate last month amid allegations of sexual harassment.

Mendoza, a Democrat from Artesia, resigned under threat that the Senate would expel him after an investigation concluded that he made six female aides uncomfortable with a pattern of  "unwanted flirtatious or sexually suggestive behavior." 

“As such, your proposed ballot designation of ‘State Senator’ is misleading,” wrote Rachelle Delucchi, an elections counsel for the secretary of state in a letter to Mendoza.

Under a 2011 settlement, Facebook agreed to get user consent for certain changes to privacy settings.
Under a 2011 settlement, Facebook agreed to get user consent for certain changes to privacy settings. (Justin Tallis / AFP/Getty Images)

California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra joined counterparts from 33 other states in demanding Monday that Facebook explain how personal information from millions of people was used without their consent by a political consulting firm with ties to Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign.

The letter asks Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg to detail when his company learned that data were being used by the firm Cambridge Analytica, how many Facebook users’ information was taken and what policies exist to make sure consumers give consent before their personal information is used by third parties.

“Facebook left millions of Californians’ personal information vulnerable,” Becerra said in a statement, adding his office intends to “make sure that consumers’ personal information is kept private and secure.”

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There was plenty of outrage to go around last week following revelations that Facebook data on some 50 million users were used to allegedly build profiles of voters, serve them tailor-made ads and try to help President Trump get elected.

  • California Legislature
Motorists make their way along the 110 Freeway in downtown Los Angeles past the Da Vinci Apartments.
Motorists make their way along the 110 Freeway in downtown Los Angeles past the Da Vinci Apartments. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

About half the single-family parcels in Los Angeles — 190,000 — could be rezoned to allow for multistory apartments and condominiums under major new state housing legislation.

That’s just one of the local impacts from Senate Bill 827, legislation from Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco). The bill is drawing cheers from some environmentalists and housing activists, but also causing major heartburn for homeowner groups and advocates for low-income residents.