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198 posts
  • State government

With tax revenue from legal pot sales in California falling short of projections, a financial analysis firm estimated Tuesday that total sales this year will be $1.9 billion, significantly less than the $3.8 billion the company expected.

The firm, New Frontier Data, had also estimated that total sales in California would reach $6.7 billion by 2025, but now says it is more likely the industry will generate $4.72 billion by then.

Most cities in California have refused to allow pot businesses, and there are tough rules for those who want state licenses to grow, distribute and sell marijuana. Both are to blame for the lower-than-projected sales, according to Giadha Aguirre De Carcer, chief executive of New Frontier Data.

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“Dream with me,” Antonio Villaraigosa urged in his 2005 inaugural address as mayor of Los Angeles, sketching out a vision of a comprehensive public transportation system that could redefine his car-choked city.

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  • California Legislature
From left, Jose Ojeda, Raul Gomez and Mary Gonzales-Gomez of the Latino Community Roundtable fold Democratic voter guides in Corcoran.
From left, Jose Ojeda, Raul Gomez and Mary Gonzales-Gomez of the Latino Community Roundtable fold Democratic voter guides in Corcoran. (Tomas Ovalle / For The Times)

Paul Wilson, a former autoworker and registered Democrat, made up his mind months ago. He is voting for Republican Rep. Jeff Denham of Turlock.

“He seems to be supporting Trump’s agenda,” Wilson, 68, said, sitting at his kitchen table in North Modesto on a breezy May afternoon, a cardboard cutout of an American flag taped to his window.

Wilson is not an outlier in the San Joaquin Valley, a major battleground for Democrats who have failed in multiple elections to persuade this Democratic-leaning region to vote for Democratic House candidates.

Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra, left, and Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones.
Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra, left, and Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

The two Democrats running for California attorney general clashed Monday over campaign television ads filmed in a Sacramento courtroom, with Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones arguing that Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra had broken the law.

“Most of the voter communication Mr. Becerra has done in this campaign benefits from these illegally staged campaign commercials in this state building,” Jones said at a news conference.

Jones submitted formal complaints to the state Fair Political Practices Commission and to the attorney general’s office, asking Becerra to appoint a special counsel to investigate.

  • Politics podcast
  • 2018 election

The campaign money in some of California’s most talked-about races during this statewide primary is being spent on television ads that could be a game changer.

We discuss some of the most interesting ads in the race for governor, insurance commissioner and two key House races in Southern California.

This week’s episode also takes a look at the findings in the recently completed investigation into allegations made against Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia.

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Judge Aaron Persky says he has no regrets.

President Trump endorsed Republican John Cox for California governor in a tweet Friday, backing that could pay dividends in consolidating the GOP vote in the June primary, increasing Cox’s chances to win a spot on the November ballot.

“California finally deserves a great Governor, one who understands borders, crime and lowering taxes. John Cox is the man - he’ll be the best Governor you’ve ever had,” the president said.

Cox said he was “honored and deeply grateful” for the endorsement.

Protesters call on L.A. County Sheriff Jim McDonnell to support the so-called sanctuary state bill.
Protesters call on L.A. County Sheriff Jim McDonnell to support the so-called sanctuary state bill. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Pushing back against the Trump administration, the California Senate and more than 20 cities and counties have come out in support of the state’s “sanctuary” law, which limits law enforcement agencies from cooperating with federal immigration agencies.

In two friend-of-the court briefs filed Friday, former U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. and Santa Clara County sided with California in a federal lawsuit brought forth by U.S. Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions over its immigration policies. Holder’s brief was filed on behalf of the state Senate, and Santa Clara was joined by 22 other California cities and counties.

Holder argued that entangling state and local agencies with federal immigration enforcement usurps limited resources, blurs lines of accountability and distorts trust between officers and the community. In their own brief, city and county lawyers said the federal government should not dictate how local or state resources are used.

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Craig Coley is shown when he was booked on suspicion of murder, left, and recently, after he was informed he'd been cleared.
Craig Coley is shown when he was booked on suspicion of murder, left, and recently, after he was informed he'd been cleared. (Simi Valley Police Department)

Gov. Jerry Brown on Thursday approved a $1.95-million payment to compensate a man wrongly sent to prison for more than 38 years for a double murder in Simi Valley that is now being investigated to determine whether it was actually the work of the Golden State Killer.

The payment was approved to Craig Richard Coley, 70, who recently was determined by a court to be “factually innocent,” decades after his arrest for the murders of Ronda Wicht, 24, and her 4-year old son, Donald.

Brown did not comment Thursday in approving the settlement, but in his pardon of Coley in November, the governor said subsequent investigations ordered by his office and prosecutors determined the man was wrongly convicted.

  • Ballot measures
  • 2018 election
(Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)

A plan to allow homeowners 55 and older to take a portion of their Proposition 13 property tax benefits with them when they move to a new California home is eligible for the statewide ballot in November, Secretary of State Alex Padilla said in a release Thursday.

The measure, sponsored by the California Assn. of Realtors, has exceeded the 585,407 valid petition signatures it needed to qualify, Padilla said.

The initiative will appear on the ballot unless proponents withdraw it prior to June 28.