Advertisement
492 posts
  • California Republicans
Former Republican gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen during a speech to the Tea Party California Caucus last year.
Former Republican gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen during a speech to the Tea Party California Caucus last year. (Silvia Flores)

Having fallen short in his recent campaign for governor, conservative state Assemblyman Travis Allen said Monday that he is weighing a run for chairman of the state GOP with the goal of “leading California Republicans back to statewide relevance.”

Allen, a resident of Huntington Beach, said he talked Monday with party Chairman Jim Brulte about the operations and priorities of the state party in preparation for making a decision on whether to vie for the leadership job.

Brulte has said he will not seek another two years as leader when his term ends in February, and a candidacy by Allen would set up another contest with former Assemblyman David Hadley, a social moderate who also ran for governor before dropping out of the race after two weeks in 2017.

Advertisement
  • California Legislature
The governor on Monday vetoed a bill that would have set mandatory minimum penalties for cannabis retailers caught selling to minors.
The governor on Monday vetoed a bill that would have set mandatory minimum penalties for cannabis retailers caught selling to minors. (Mathew Sumner)

Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday vetoed a bill that would have set mandatory minimum penalties for California pot shops that sell to minors, including revocation of the state license for a third violation in three years.

The measure by Sen. Jean Fuller (R-Bakersfield) would have restricted the Bureau of Cannabis Control’s “ability to carry out enforcement actions based on the pertinent facts of a violation,” Brown said in his veto message.

“This bill is not necessary,” the governor added. “The bureau already has the authority to revoke, suspend and assess fines if a licensee sells to a minor.”

Advertisement
  • State government
Gov. Jerry Brown, seen here in May, said that President Trump is helping China become the world's leader at producing electric cars.
Gov. Jerry Brown, seen here in May, said that President Trump is helping China become the world's leader at producing electric cars. (Rich Pedroncelli / AP)

California Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday accused President Trump of undermining the nation’s efforts to produce more electric vehicles, arguing that efforts to slow down the focus on clean energy will ultimately hurt the U.S. auto industry.

“The big driver besides California is China,” Brown said in an interview with The Times about improved battery technology. “The big saboteur is Donald Trump. He’s trying to subsidize coal and destroy the electric car.”

The governor, who had earlier signed a landmark bill to move California toward 100% clean electricity, is hosting an international climate change summit later in the week in San Francisco. Brown said the three-day event is designed to keep “building momentum” toward expanded and new efforts at reducing greenhouse gas emissions across the world. It is an agenda that has put the veteran Democratic politician on an occasional collision course with the Republican president.

Under the glare of neon signs and unforgiving fluorescent office lights, bail agents are spending time processing a new California law signed just days ago by Gov. Jerry Brown that could decimate their industry.

Advertisement
(Los Angeles Times)

An effort by the California Legislature to reduce voter confusion through a ballot redesign was vetoed Friday by Gov. Jerry Brown, who said the problem doesn’t need to be solved with a new law.

The bill would have mandated new language to make voters aware of how many candidates they could choose in any given race. In the last two statewide primaries, long lists of candidates for the U.S. Senate and governor have led to calls for a wholesale redesign of ballots.

Assembly Bill 2552 would have imposed rules on the color or style of wording instructing voters to “vote for one” in single-candidate contests, an attempt by lawmakers to address confusion over long lists that may appear to apply to more than one race.

  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
(Jonathan Newton / Washington Post)

Former President Obama will appear in Anaheim on Saturday morning  to rally support for seven congressional candidates running for key House seats in California.

The event, which was announced this week, will be held in a ballroom in the Anaheim Convention Center. Doors open at 10 a.m. and the event will get underway about 10:15 a.m.

Tickets are being distributed by the candidates’ campaigns to their supporters. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, which is organizing the rally, says it anticipates about 750 people will attend.

Gubernatorial candidate John Cox speaks to delegates at the California Republican Party convention in San Diego in May.
Gubernatorial candidate John Cox speaks to delegates at the California Republican Party convention in San Diego in May. (Kent Nishimura)

Financial regulators fined Republican gubernatorial candidate John Cox and his firm $15,000 in 2004 for mishandling investors’ funds in a housing deal, according to records filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Along with the fine, which was first reported by the Sacramento Bee, Cox was also censured by the National Assn. of Securities Dealers, which regulates the securities industry. The agency is now known as the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.

Records show that Cox did not admit to or deny the allegations at the time. He was fined $2,500 and his firm, Financial Equity Associates, was fined $12,500.

Advertisement
  • State government
  • California Legislature
A line of people stretches around a California Department of Motor Vehicles building in South L.A. last month.
A line of people stretches around a California Department of Motor Vehicles building in South L.A. last month. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Two months after the California Department of Motor Vehicles came under scrutiny for hours-long wait times, the agency said Wednesday that it has reduced lines by flooding offices with new workers but that continued delays are not acceptable.

Agency Director Jean Shiomoto wrote in a letter to legislators that the agency has provided “better, faster and more constituent services” in the last month by hiring an additional 468 employees and bringing back 112 retired workers, while expediting improvements to computer systems and processes.

The DMV has blamed the waits on the rollout of the federal Real ID, which was designed to enhance driver’s license and identification card security, and the Motor Voter Act, which made it easier for Californians to register to vote through the DMV.

  • State government
(Salvador Rodriguez / Los Angeles Times)

Two new laws allowing Californians to legally change their gender went into effect over the Labor Day weekend, simplifying the process of obtaining state-issued documents and court orders for the identity designation.

Both bills were signed into law in 2017, but didn’t go into effect until Sept. 1.

“Mindful of all the people I know who are gender-nonconforming, and the families I know with transgender children, I wanted to make sure that California continued to be a leader in gender-identity equality,” the author of the bills, state Senate President Pro Tem Toni Atkins (D-San Diego) said on Tuesday.