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Proponents of net neutrality protest against Federal Communication Commission Chairman Ajit Pai in Washington on May 5.
Proponents of net neutrality protest against Federal Communication Commission Chairman Ajit Pai in Washington on May 5. (Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)

As the fight to preserve net neutrality gears up in California, two state senators are melding their efforts to establish rules that would prevent internet service providers from manipulating or slowing access to online content.

Under new amendments unveiled Monday, Sens. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) and Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles) have rewritten their dueling net neutrality bills to complement each other — and added conditions so that both must be signed by the governor for the other to take effect.

The move comes a week after net neutrality was officially repealed at the federal level, following a vote by the Federal Communications Commission in December to roll back the rules.

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  • California Democrats
San Francisco Mayor-elect London Breed, center, greets students after a news conference on June 14 in San Francisco.
San Francisco Mayor-elect London Breed, center, greets students after a news conference on June 14 in San Francisco. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

After a hard-fought, history-making campaign, San Francisco’s Mayor-elect London Breed took a four-day vacation in Cabo San Lucas. Now ready to assume office, the city’s first African American woman mayor talked to The Times this week about how she’ll tackle some of the biggest challenges facing the Bay Area city. Breed, who was raised by her grandmother in public housing, said homelessness and affordable housing will be among her top priorities. (This interview was edited and condensed for clarity.)

Your campaign was sort of defined by the adversity you faced as a kid growing up in the city. How do you reconnect people who are natives of a city that in recent years has become a very different place?

I think so many people are not in the city anymore that I grew up with. I think what’s important is to make sure that people who are either natives of San Francisco, or live there now, especially those who are struggling, feel like they are part of our city — feel like it’s their city too and also feel like there are opportunities that exist in this city for them. Especially the future generations and kids who are growing up now in poverty. I also want to make sure we make better decisions and incorporate everyone into the prosperity that exists in our city.

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Kevin de León stresses that he isn’t naive about his chances of taking down Sen. Dianne Feinstein in November’s general election.

  • 2018 election
  • California Democrats

Former President Barack Obama is returning to Los Angeles on June 28 to headline a fundraiser for the Democratic National Committee.

Tickets for the gala start at $2,700, which buys access to the former president’s speech as well as a performance by singer Christina Aguilera, according to the invitation.

To get fed, donors must pony up at least $15,000. The top ticket package, which includes five dinner tickets, premium seating, a picture, a reception, membership to the DNC finance committee and entry to two other events in 2018, goes for $100,000.

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  • California Republicans
Ivanka Trump arrives for a news conference in the Rose Garden last week.
Ivanka Trump arrives for a news conference in the Rose Garden last week. (Richard Drew / Associated Press)

Ivanka Trump will travel to California next week to attend fundraisers with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, according to an invitation obtained by The Times and media reports

The two will headline events in Fresno and Los Angeles on Monday. Proceeds from the fundraisers will support Protect the House, a political action committee led by McCarthy and Vice President Mike Pence that is focused on protecting GOP control of Congress.

The eldest daughter of President Trump is not a regular on the fundraising circuit, but her visit is a sign of the priority that the administration places on the effort, particularly in California. The state is home to multiple congressional districts that are top targets for Democrats because they favored Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election but are represented in Congress by Republicans. 

  • State government
  • California Legislature
The governor has signed a new law aimed at improving the tracking of hate crimes by local law enforcement agencies.
The governor has signed a new law aimed at improving the tracking of hate crimes by local law enforcement agencies. (Associated Press)

After a state audit faulted law enforcement agencies including the Los Angeles Police Department for underreporting hate crimes, Gov. Jerry Brown has signed a measure that seeks to improve the investigation and tracking of incidents based on race, gender and sexual orientation, officials said Thursday.

The new law, which takes effect in January, sets minimum standards for how local law enforcement agencies investigate and report hate crimes, and addresses issues in a May 31 state audit that found hate crimes are underreported by 14% in California.

“We can’t stop the problem unless we know how big it is,” said Assemblyman Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), who introduced AB 1985. “My bill requires law enforcement to use the same language and follow the same reporting procedures so that we can get an accurate picture of the prevalence of hate crimes in California.

  • Ballot measures
  • 2018 election
Gavin Newsom, the Democratic candidate for governor, mixes with supporters at a rally Wednesday, saying he opposes breaking up the state.
Gavin Newsom, the Democratic candidate for governor, mixes with supporters at a rally Wednesday, saying he opposes breaking up the state. (Patrick McGreevy)

California’s Democratic gubernatorial candidate Gavin Newsom said Wednesday that he has been a friend of Silicon Valley venture capitalist Tim Draper for 20 years, but he is opposing a November ballot initiative championed by Draper to break California into three states.

“He is an incredibly bright and capable person,” Newsom told reporters at a campaign event in Sacramento. “That is not [exemplified] in this initiative, and I will not be supporting the initiative, and I don’t expect the people of this state will support it.”

Newsom, the lieutenant governor, faces Republican John Cox in the November election for governor.

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  • 2018 election
Sen. leader Toni Atkins, left, state Democratic Party Chair Eric Bauman and Gov. Jerry Brown listen to Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom speak at rally
Sen. leader Toni Atkins, left, state Democratic Party Chair Eric Bauman and Gov. Jerry Brown listen to Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom speak at rally (Jonathan J. Cooper)

Rallying Democrats for the November election, Gov. Jerry Brown said Wednesday that he looks forward to passing the baton to Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, the party’s candidate for governor, who in turn promised to continue the progressive agenda pursued by Brown.

Standing in front of about four dozen activists and other Democratic candidates for state office, the 80-year-old governor said he would campaign for Newsom, saying the 50-year-old candidate would bring a “creative, energetic” approach to the governor’s office.

“Gavin Newsom will get stuff done. There is a time for an old guy, and there is time for a young guy,” Brown said, drawing laughter during the event at the state Democratic Party headquarters in Sacramento. “I was the right man at the right time, and right now Gavin Newsom is the right man at the right time for the next four years in California.”

  • Ballot measures
  • 2018 election
It would be the first division of an existing U.S. state since the creation of West Virginia in 1863.

California voters will have a historic decision to make in November’s election: whether they should live in three new states instead of one.

The proposal that qualified Tuesday for the fall ballot is far from the final step in the process, nor is its passage a guarantee that Northern California, Southern California and California would be newly drawn onto maps of the United States.

Here’s what would happen if voters approve the ballot measure by simple majority on Nov. 6.