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298 posts
  • State government
  • 2018 election
Shown is the design for a roadway sign mentioning funds from California's new gas tax increase.
Shown is the design for a roadway sign mentioning funds from California's new gas tax increase. (Caltrans)

An Orange County state senator, who won a special election in June that was triggered by California’s recent gas tax increase, wants transportation officials to remove the signs that point out road repairs paid for with the funds.

Sen. Ling Ling Chang (R-Diamond Bar) wrote to California Department of Transportation officials last week to protest the signs as “inappropriate,” given voters might repeal the tax hike in November with Proposition 6.

“No matter what the issue, it is not the job of taxpayer-funded state departments to influence public opinion on matters considered on the ballot,” Chang wrote in a letter to Laurie Berman, the director of Caltrans.

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  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
Former gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen, left, has endorsed fellow Republican John Cox in the race.
Former gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen, left, has endorsed fellow Republican John Cox in the race.

Nearly two months after the primary, former gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen has endorsed fellow Republican John Cox in the race.

“It's time we put the Primary past us and UNITE to WIN IN NOVEMBER,” Allen tweeted on Sunday to back his onetime rival. “Join TODAY, and together let’s TAKE BACK CALIFORNIA!!”

Cox responded by complimenting Allen.

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Seattle's skyline
Seattle's skyline (Robert E. Klein / Associated Press)

Seattle is booming. 

It’s seen some of the highest growth among large cities in recent years, as Amazon and other tech-fueled job gains has added pressure to boost housing production. Home prices have grown about $200,000 in the past two years, but rents are starting to level off and prices remain below those in the Bay Area.

On this episode of Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Pod, we speak with Seattle Times reporter Mike Rosenberg about how Seattle approaches housing issues compared with California. Rosenberg, who has one of the most widely followed Twitter accounts on housing issues, also talks about how he spots trends in political debates across the country.

  • State government
(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

Gov. Jerry Brown will keep his imprint on the state’s powerful climate change agency beyond his time in office following an agency vote Thursday.

The California Air Resources Board, the state’s climate change and air quality regulator, granted 11 of its 14 members terms beyond the end of this year. The decision ensures that the next governor — either Democrat Gavin Newsom or Republican John Cox — won’t be able to appoint a majority of the board’s leadership for the entirety of his first term in office unless existing positions become vacant.

“I’m sure the next governor will be OK with a few of the folks here remaining on the board,” member Hector De La Torre said during debate on the measure.

(Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)

Sen. Dianne Feinstein leads fellow Democrat and state Sen. Kevin de León by 46% to 24% among likely voters in the race for the seat she’s held since 1992, according to a new poll by the Public Policy Institute of California.

Just 9% of likely voters reported being undecided, leaving De León with little room to close the gap in the roughly 100 days left until the election.

The poll found that 47% of Republicans and 24% of independents say they don’t plan to vote in the Senate race at all.

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Republican gubernatorial candidate John Cox, left, and Democratic rival Gavin Newsom.
Republican gubernatorial candidate John Cox, left, and Democratic rival Gavin Newsom. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times; Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom has a dominant lead over the wealthy Rancho Santa Fe businessman John Cox in the race for California governor, according to a new poll by the Public Policy Institute of California.

Opportunities for Cox to pick up support before the November election also appear to be limited, with just 9% of likely voters saying they were undecided.

“The electorate is very polarized today. For Republicans it’s hard to imagine voting for a Democrat. For Democrats, it’s hard to imagine voting for a Republican,” institute President Mark Baldassare said.

  • Ballot measures
Former Rep. Doug Ose, left, has submitted a proposed ballot measure specifying that only U.S. citizens can vote in local or state elections.
Former Rep. Doug Ose, left, has submitted a proposed ballot measure specifying that only U.S. citizens can vote in local or state elections. (Steve Yeater / Associated Press)

In the wake of San Francisco’s decision to remove citizenship status as a requirement for those voting in school board elections, a former Sacramento congressman said on Wednesday that he’ll work to change state law to block such efforts.

Doug Ose, a Republican who served in the House of Representatives from 1999 to 2005, submitted a proposed ballot measure to state officials that would ban voting by those in the U.S. illegally.

“It’s very simple. I don’t think noncitizens should be voting,” Ose said.

  • 2018 election

The Los Angeles Times inadvertently published embargoed poll results. Please return at 9 p.m. to see this article.

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(Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

California’s top climate regulator will continue serving through 2020 under a plan set to be voted on Thursday.

Mary Nichols, who has led the California Air Resources Board since 2007, would see her term expire at the end of 2020 if the board’s members confirm staff recommendations at the Thursday meeting. The Air Resources Board is one of the most powerful agencies in the state, and is responsible for implementing California’s strict greenhouse gas and air pollution rules.

Legislation passed in 2016 authorizes Air Resources Board members to serve six-year terms, part of an effort by lawmakers to wrest some control over the agency from the governor, who appoints a dozen of the board’s 14 members. The new law, however, allowed initial terms in office to be staggered so that the board wouldn’t see constant turnover.

David Hadley, seen here greeting voters after a 2016 Assembly candidates' forum, was appointed vice chairman of the state Republican Party.
David Hadley, seen here greeting voters after a 2016 Assembly candidates' forum, was appointed vice chairman of the state Republican Party. (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)

Former legislator David Hadley was unanimously appointed vice chairman of the California Republican Party on Tuesday by its board of directors. The move eases the path for the Manhattan Beach resident to become the party’s next leader once current Chairman Jim Brulte’s term ends in February.

Hadley, who ran for governor earlier this year before dropping out of the race after two weeks, served one term in the state Assembly representing much of the South Bay.

The 53-year-old businessman is a social moderate and fiscal conservative who has ties to prominent donors, relationships that could prove vital if next year’s chairman’s race is contested, and should he be elected leader of the state party.