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1349 posts
  • Domestic policy
  • The economy

Closing in on the first major legislative achievement of his term, President Trump on Saturday defended the Republican tax cut as a good deal for the middle class while boldly suggesting it could lead to explosive economic growth.

The legislation, which the GOP aims to muscle through Congress next week, would lower taxes on the richest Americans. Benefits, if any, for most other taxpayers would be smaller, but Trump attempted to sell the bill as a "Christmas present" for middle-class Americans in part because he says it would trigger job growth.

"It'll be fantastic for the middle-income people and for jobs, most of all," Trump told reporters on the White House lawn before traveling to Camp David, Md., for the weekend. "And I will say that because of what we've done with regulation and other things our economy is doing fantastically well, but it has another big step to go, and it can't take that step unless we do the tax bill."

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  • The economy
  • Fox News

President Trump celebrated the major stock indexes hitting a new set of milestones Friday by tweeting a video clip of a Fox Business report on the record close.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index climbed 23.80 points, or 0.9%, to 2,675.81. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 143.08 points, or 0.6%, to 24,651.74. The Nasdaq advanced 80.06 points, or 1.2%, to 6,936.58. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks jumped 23.47 points, or 1.6%, to 1,530.42.

The Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq closed at record highs.

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President Trump gave a distinctly mixed message to the FBI on Friday, saying “people are very, very angry” about what they see as a political bias in the bureau but vowing unqualified support for law enforcement.

“Well, it’s a shame what’s happened with the FBI,” Trump told reporters at the White House before he flew to Quantico, Va., to address graduates at the FBI Academy. “But we’re going to rebuild the FBI. It will be bigger and better than ever.”

Trump later tweeted a video clip of his remarks at the ceremony and extended his congratulations to graduates:

  • Accolades
  • Domestic policy
  • The economy

President Trump appeared optimistic Thursday morning following Republican leaders' agreement Wednesday on a revised plan to cut taxes.

The tentative accord, which reportedly would lower the corporate rate from 35% to 21% and drop the top individual rate for the richest Americans to 37%, marked a significant step in the Republican push to have a tax bill on Trump’s desk by Christmas.

Trump tweeted that the plan was “looking very good” and touted another stock market record set Wednesday, when the Dow Jones industrial average eked out its third record-high close in as many days.

  • His schedule
  • Domestic policy
  • The economy

President Trump is relishing the rolling back of federal rules in his administration's first year, even as critics say he has tried to dismantle important protections for the environment, consumers and others.

"By ending excessive regulation, we are defending democracy and draining the swamp," Trump said Thursday, flanked by administration officials at a White House event. The effort is driven by Trump's contention that there are too many rules and that's stifling economic growth — a claim critics say is overstated.

Trump signed an executive order days after taking office in January that directed agencies to identify two regulations to cut for every new one they intended to issue. Agencies also had to offset any new regulatory costs with cuts by eliminating existing rules.

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She is among President Trump’s most high-profile black supporters, a reality television star turned government official.

Now, Omarosa Manigault Newman is set to leave her role as director of communications in the White House Office of Public Liaison, a position in which she was tasked with working on outreach to various constituency groups.

Trump late Wednesday thanked Manigault Newman for her service.

  • Accolades
  • Politics and polls

President Trump, who stuck with Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore despite warnings from fellow Republicans that Moore was sullying their party, defended his decision after Democrat Doug Jones’ historic win on Tuesday.

“I was right!” Trump tweeted early Wednesday, alluding to his earlier endorsement of Luther Strange, the incumbent Republican senator whom Moore upset in a party primary. Moore, who faced allegations that he preyed on young girls decades ago, had “the deck stacked against him!” Trump wrote.

Trump said he nonetheless worked hard for the candidate, but that Moore’s loss justified his own initial endorsement of Strange. 

  • On the media
  • Insults
  • Fox News

President Trump responded to a “Fox & Friends” segment on news coverage of his administration, which the morning talk show called “hostile.”

The segment focused on the results of a survey conducted by conservative watchdog Media Research Center, which purportedly analyzed the evening news broadcasts on ABC, CBS and NBC from Sept. 1 to Nov. 30 and found that 91% of the statements made about Trump were negative.

“Hence my use of Social Media, the only way to get the truth out,” Trump shot back early Wednesday in a tweet.

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President Trump congratulated Democrat Doug Jones, who started the Alabama race for U.S. Senate as a massive underdog but swept to victory Tuesday night in a repudiation of scandal-stained Roy Moore.

"The write-in votes played a very big factor, but a win is a win," Trump tweeted a short time after the result was announced.

That contrasted with a tweet from Trump earlier Tuesday, soon after polls in Alabama opened, in which he implored voters there to “do the right thing” and choose Moore.

  • Accolades
  • Domestic policy
  • The economy

President Trump tweeted Tuesday morning that things were “looking good” for the GOP tax bill.

That came as House and Senate negotiators swapped new offers on the bill as they hurried to resolve differences and regain momentum for passage of Trump’s top priority.

The focal point of the $1.5-trillion tax plan — the steep reduction in corporate rates from 35% to 20% — is expected to be relaxed slightly in the final deal, perhaps to 21%, as negotiators scramble to generate revenue that can be used to offset tax breaks elsewhere.