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Cannabis, pot, weed, reefer, marijuana -- whatever you call it, if it's mentioned in the pages of the Los Angeles Times and its sister papers, we've added it to our rolling collection of cannabis-related content.

Thinking about treating Rover with reefer? Read this first

Research is needed on whether marijuana-derived products can be helpful to pets, experts say. (Jim Mone / Associated Press)
Research is needed on whether marijuana-derived products can be helpful to pets, experts say. (Jim Mone / Associated Press)

Pot for pets is a big business — dispensaries across California offer a range of cannabis-derived products formulated for the four-legged members of your family — think capsules for cats, biscuits for dogs and tinctures, oils and ointments for both.

According to the products’ testimonial-filled websites and pamphlets, the pet-specific formulations can potentially relieve many of the same ailments for which humans consume cannabis, including pain, nausea, anxiety and seizures.

But though its effect on humans is fairly well understood, cannabis’ effects on those of the canine and feline persuasion haven’t been well studied — and that’s just one of the reasons veterinarians suggest that pet parents thinking about slipping kitty some kush should consider hitting the pause button.

“There is no research that shows any benefit,” said veterinarian Ken Pawlowski, immediate past president of the California Veterinary Medical Assn. and the organization’s point person on the issue. “We’re not saying that there aren’t any, [only] there is no research out there that demonstrates the benefits or, more importantly, what appropriate doses of what compounds might be indicated.”

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