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538 posts
  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
Democrat Gil Cisneros is running in the 39th Congressional District
Democrat Gil Cisneros is running in the 39th Congressional District (Ringo H.W. Chiu / Associated Press)

The Congressional Leadership Fund, a conservative super PAC spending millions of dollars on competitive House races across the state, will no longer run an ad centered on a now-recanted sexual harassment claim made against Democratic candidate Gil Cisneros. 

The move comes a day after the woman, who had accused Cisneros of inappropriate behavior at and after a Democratic Party conference months ago, called the episode a “huge misunderstanding.”

Cisneros is locked in a competitive battle with Republican Young Kim for the 39th Congressional District seat left open by retiring Rep. Ed Royce (R-Fullerton).

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A line of customers stretches around the South L.A. location of a California Department of Motor Vehicles office in August.
A line of customers stretches around the South L.A. location of a California Department of Motor Vehicles office in August. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Supporters of Proposition 6 on Monday took their campaign to eight offices of the state Department of Motor Vehicles, saying the beleaguered agency is an example of mismanagement that should persuade taxpayers to approve their initiative that would repeal recent increases to the state gas tax and vehicle fees.

The DMV has come under fire in recent months for hours-long wait times, resulting in Gov. Jerry Brown ordering an audit on Sept. 21 by his Department of Finance. Proposition 6 campaign leader Carl DeMaio appeared at the DMV’s Clairemont office in San Diego and called for a more detailed and independent review to instead be done by the state auditor.

“You cannot trust California state bureaucracies with a single penny of your money,” DeMaio said after his news conference. “The DMV’s culture of chaos is another example of mismanagement.”

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Gov. Jerry Brown ushered in a new era of transparency in California law enforcement on Sunday, signing two new laws that for the first time give the public access to internal police investigations and video footage of shootings by police officers and other serious incidents.

Gov. Jerry Brown on Sunday restored net neutrality rules in California that were repealed under the Trump administration, setting up a legal battle with the federal government over whether states can prevent companies from blocking access to the internet.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation on Sunday that limits who can be prosecuted for felony murder to those who commit or intend to commit a killing.

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An old Sacramento adage uses baseball imagery to explain the power of California’s chief executive at the end of the legislative process: “The governor bats last.”

Volunteer Rachele Huennekens during a demonstration at Safer Inside, a model of a safe injection site in San Francisco.
Volunteer Rachele Huennekens during a demonstration at Safer Inside, a model of a safe injection site in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Citing fears of “enabling illegal drug use,” Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed a measure on Sunday that would have allowed San Francisco to establish sites where people could inject illegal drugs in a supervised, hygienic environment.

Under Assembly Bill 186 by Assemblywoman Susan Talamantes Eggman (D-Stockton), the city would have been allowed to start a pilot program for “safe injection sites” that backers said could help address the opioid crisis.

Proponents say such sites help prevent fatal overdoses by offering access to clean needles, trained supervisors and referral to treatment programs. There are about 100 secure injection facilities around the world, according to a legislative analysis.

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Former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson speaks in support of a California bill aimed at protecting workers from forced arbitration
Former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson speaks in support of a California bill aimed at protecting workers from forced arbitration (AP Photo/Sophia Bollag, File)

Gov. Jerry Brown on Sunday vetoed a pair of #MeToo-inspired bills that would have made it easier to take sexual harassment complaints to court.

One measure, Assembly Bill 3080, sought to end the practice of employers requiring workers to use private arbitration instead of the courts to air out sexual harassment complaints.

Arbitration is one of several ways businesses can opt to settle disputes outside of the courts. The practice has come under scrutiny in the #MeToo era as a way to shield complaints of improper workplace behavior from public view and protect harassers from accountability.

(Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

Gov. Jerry Brown on Sunday signed a bill to help hundreds of thousands of Californians convicted of marijuana crimes have felonies reduced to misdemeanors and lower-level offenses removed from their record.

The measure builds on the 2016 voter approval of Proposition 64, which legalized the growing and sale of marijuana and allowed residents to possess up to an ounce of cannabis or six home-grown plants for recreational use.

The ballot measure allows those with past convictions to petition the courts to expunge misdemeanors and reduce felony charges.