Food

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Jonathan Gold

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  • Burmese cooking gets creative at Daw Yee Myanmar Corner in Silver Lake

    Burmese cooking gets creative at Daw Yee Myanmar Corner in Silver Lake

    Have the design magazines made it out to Daw Yee Myanmar Corner yet? Because it is hard to imagine a restaurant better-suited to a page or two in Dwell: a small Silver Lake dining room decked out with glowing pink-and-blue neon and a black-and-white tiled wall, gilded faux-crocodile wallpaper,...

  • Jonathan Gold reviews the Cannibal, your New World Order butcher-shop-and-beer restaurant

    Jonathan Gold reviews the Cannibal, your New World Order butcher-shop-and-beer restaurant

    My brother Mark, who has been to the environmental movement in Los Angeles more or less what James Worthy was to the Lakers, is particular about what he eats. He still hasn’t forgiven me for a shark’s fin dumpling I accidentally chose from a dim sum cart in 1992, and I once saw him approach something...

  • Where to find Jonathan Gold's favorite cold noodle dishes

    Where to find Jonathan Gold's favorite cold noodle dishes

    When the weather gets hot, the noodles get cold. And here are some of the coldest. Yu Chun — How cold is Yu Chun’s mool chic naengmyun? So cold that it gives you an ice cream headache. So cold that the tangy beef broth builds up in soft drifts in the middle of the bowl. So cold that the customary...

Lunchtime Chats

Dining Out

Home Cooking

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Why you'll want to figure out how to use a spiralizer

I came late to the spiralizer party. I’d never heard of the gadget that turns vegetables into noodle-like strands until about a year ago, when I started seeing dishes with names such as “Zinguine™” on restaurant menus. The gluten-free and paleo crowd have been onto this tool for some time — it’s...

Recipes

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Beer, Wine and Cocktails

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Wines of the week: Chenin blancs

Wines of the week: Chenin blancs

Wine trends in California can be exceedingly subtle, particularly when they involve wines as transparent as Chenin Blanc, a white variety that’s been around for more than a century in California. For about the last 30 years, it’s gone largely overlooked and unregarded, until a dozen or so local...

MORE FROM FOOD

  • The geometry of pie: Because round may be boring, but we love it anyway

    The geometry of pie: Because round may be boring, but we love it anyway

    Call it pie fate, something I have a little experience with. Recently I received two emails on the same day. The first: What did I think of talking to WNYC “The Sporkful” podcast host Dan Pashman about the merits of round versus square pie? On his podcast, Pashman  often explores food construction...

  • Ruth Reichl's review of Michel Richard's original L.A. restaurant Citrus

    Ruth Reichl's review of Michel Richard's original L.A. restaurant Citrus

    Michel Richard, who died Aug. 13 at age 68 from complications of a stroke, helped establish Washington, D.C., as a major dining city when he opened the restaurant Citronelle in 1994. But it was Richard’s Los Angeles restaurant Citrus, opened in 1987, that first brought him acclaim in the U.S., beyond...

  • Your L.A. farmers market-driven drought update

    Your L.A. farmers market-driven drought update

    The news came via Instagram, as much of the news does these days. “Dear Valued Customers,” the text read, “ Due to Stage III drought conditions I have been mandated to cut my water use by 42%.” In black typeface against a white square background, Romeo Coleman who, along with his father Bill and...

  • Farmers market report: Corn is in season. We have recipes

    Farmers market report: Corn is in season. We have recipes

    What’s in season: As the temperatures rise, so do the mounds of corn piling high at the market now through mid-autumn, the season typically beginning in June and generally extending through September. Fans of white and yellow varieties have their beliefs as to which is sweeter and more flavorful,...

  • Summer wine cocktails make a splash beyond sangria

    Summer wine cocktails make a splash beyond sangria

    For years, wine cocktails have gotten a bad rap. Hear the term, and you might vaguely remember college days filled with wine spritzers and bottled wine coolers, the alcohol cut with sparkling water or teeth-jarring sweeteners, with flavorings both natural and otherwise, the beverages a color palette...

  • How to make ice cream and other frozen treats without a machine

    How to make ice cream and other frozen treats without a machine

    If there’s one dish that signifies summer, it’s probably ice cream. Be it a simple bowlful or carefully balanced scoops piled high in a sugar cone, this is the stuff of bright colors and vivid flavors, perhaps a little messy but always fun. It’s an easy antidote to the heat that takes us straight...

  • Jonathan Gold reviews Lasa, a temporary Filipino restaurant with long-range ambitions

    Jonathan Gold reviews Lasa, a temporary Filipino restaurant with long-range ambitions

    We are here once again at the Far East Plaza, the modest Chinatown mall that is home to the recently reviewed Howlin’ Ray’s, Pok Pok Phat Thai and Chego, among other players in the current food movement. We are in Unit 120, the self-described restaurant incubator space, run by Alvin Cailan, whom...

  • Crispy, golden, flavorful: That's Terrine's pickle-brined fried chicken. Here's the recipe.

    Crispy, golden, flavorful: That's Terrine's pickle-brined fried chicken. Here's the recipe.

    Done right, fried chicken is a beautiful thing. Unpretentious as this classic comfort food might be, there’s a definite art to it: a tender piece of meat, delicately seasoned and lightly dredged with a dusting of flour, then baptized in a pool of sizzling fat to crisp, golden perfection. And while...

  • A rosé wine primer for beginners, experts and weirdos

    A rosé wine primer for beginners, experts and weirdos

    What is there to “know” about rosé wines? Grape juice, bled or blended or vinified pink, liberally applied on hot sunny days, made to chill, glug, repeat? Well, yes, that’s about it. Except that the market for rosé, once a trickle, is now a flood so massive it’s practically biblical. And just like...

  • Near the Tehachapi Mountains, a family farm looks to a future without GMOs

    Near the Tehachapi Mountains, a family farm looks to a future without GMOs

    Stand in a field of wheat — amid the undulating stalks of grain, the blue dome of the sky overhead — and it’s hard not to be moved by the landscape, like you’ve stumbled into a patriotic song, which of course you have. When you’re the farmer, the stanza runs a little differently. You still have...

  • Jonathan Gold reviews Kali Restaurant: It's too much of a good thing

    Jonathan Gold reviews Kali Restaurant: It's too much of a good thing

    When you walk into Kali, maybe at the end of a short stroll from the Paramount lot down the street, one of the first things you see, perhaps even before you have registered the dining counter or the kitchen, is the giant grinning pig’s head behind glass. It’s not the only thing in that refrigerator,...

  • Going full curry cray at E.P. & L.P. with Aussie chef Louis Tikaram

    Going full curry cray at E.P. & L.P. with Aussie chef Louis Tikaram

    Louis Tikaram, the 31-year-old executive chef at E.P. & L.P. (the name stands for the musical terms “extended play and long play”), a Thai-Fijian-Indian-Chinese restaurant in West Hollywood, is at a prep station in his open kitchen, behind a long, shiny metal chef’s counter, putting on latex gloves....

  • Where to go for ibrik coffee, also called Arabic or Turkish coffee, in L.A.

    Where to go for ibrik coffee, also called Arabic or Turkish coffee, in L.A.

    It’s easy enough to make coffee in an ibrik (or cezve) at home, but for those times you want to go out and enjoy the coffee over, say, a book or a long conversation, you’ll be happy to discover that ibriks line the back counters of many restaurants and cafés around Los Angeles. You’ll usually find...

  • Roussanne, a Rhône Valley white wine that's both maddening and majestic

    Roussanne, a Rhône Valley white wine that's both maddening and majestic

    Winemaker Bob Lindquist of Qupé, one of California’s preeminent Rhône Rangers, came to the grape variety Roussanne late, perhaps because it is regarded as the most maddening of the Rhône Valley’s whites. He was already making Viognier and a quietly spectacular Marsanne, arguably the country’s best,...

  • How to make socca and other delicious pancakes with chickpea flour

    How to make socca and other delicious pancakes with chickpea flour

    You can find savory chickpea pancakes on tables in France, Italy, Gibraltar, parts of northern Africa — and, these days, many restaurants across America. It’s easy to understand the widespread appeal. This delicious crepe has a lovely, slightly earthy flavor, smooth, moist interior and crispy browned...

  • Jonathan Gold reviews Howlin' Ray's Hot Chicken

    Jonathan Gold reviews Howlin' Ray's Hot Chicken

    What happens when you take your first bite of Nashville hot chicken, say the Howlin’ Hot fried chicken at Chinatown’s Howlin’ Ray’s?  You burn your fingers for one thing — the bird is just out of the fryer, and you’ll probably want to tear the quarter-chicken in half for easy eating — as a good...

  • How to make Turkish coffee at home

    How to make Turkish coffee at home

    Ayperi Demircioglu is at the back of the Anatolian Gift Shop in Huntington Beach, calmly watching as a small pot of coffee begins to bubble. Savoring a cup of the rich, thick brew is a ritual she’s relished since she was a child, raised near the Black Sea in Turkey. She is brewing a pot of Turkish...

  • The rye-volution: Rye whiskey’s moment continues

    The rye-volution: Rye whiskey’s moment continues

    Rye whiskey has been having a moment for more than a few years now. According to the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States, rye whiskey volumes grew 536% from 2009 to 2014, to more than half a million 9-liter cases. As new distilling techniques and styles emerge, rye continues to evolve,...

  • Esdras Ochoa, the taco missionary

    Esdras Ochoa, the taco missionary

    The origin myth of the taquero is often embedded in a street scene, maybe from a Cormac McCarthy border town, or a home kitchen somewhere in Sonora or Michoacán or East L.A., tortillas made by mothers and grandmothers, meat on a fire. Not on a Mormon mission in the Pacific Northwest. Yet that’s...

  • Inside the grand Hollywood restaurant Paley, Jonathan Gold takes amused small bites

    Inside the grand Hollywood restaurant Paley, Jonathan Gold takes amused small bites

    The last time I visited Paley, a bored parking attendant waved me into a Do Not Enter lane, through a maze of narrow passageways and down to a cavernous lower level where mine was pretty much the only car. An elevator whooshed me up to an unfinished office floor of a glass-and-steel building. A...

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