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1291 posts
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Last week, The Times reported that far fewer students than usual had submitted California Dream Act applications for college financial aid.

The drop in applications —  from about 34,170 last year to 20,100 this year — had officials worried that students who came into the country without legal papers were forgoing valuable financial aid out of concern about President Trump's immigration policies and fear that filling out information might put them at risk.

But stories about the application shortfall and officials' assurances that student information would be kept safe helped turned the tide. So did the work of the school districts across the state that held financial aid workshops.

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(Alex Brandon / Associated Press)

President Trump arrived at St. Andrew Catholic School in the Pine Hills neighborhood along with Gov. Rick Scott, Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, and – joining Trump at an event for the first time since the election – U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio.

Trump’s daughter Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner, a White House advisor, also were on hand.

“Beautiful class, beautiful students, right?” said Trump as he walked into teacher Jane Jones’ fourth-grade classroom.

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  • Higher Education
University of Oregon Students exit Deady Hall on the campus of the University of Oregon Wednesday on Jan. 25.
University of Oregon Students exit Deady Hall on the campus of the University of Oregon Wednesday on Jan. 25. (Brian Davies / Associated Press)

After a wave of activism created a frenzy concerning campus sexual assault, the Obama administration twice rewrote federal rules governing how allegations must be handled at colleges and universities. In response to this movement, too many schools have adopted procedures that force accused students to turn to the courts for any hope of justice.

In particular, since 2011, when the Department of Education reinterpreted Title IX to require that sexual assault cases be judged by a “preponderance of the evidence” — a lower burden of proof than is used in criminal cases — more than 100 accused students have sued their schools. In most of these recent cases the colleges have lost, as they should have.

Our close examination of court records shows how the new mandates and procedures amount to a de facto presumption of guilt. It also shows that colleges are at best incapable of adjudicating allegedly criminal conduct, and at worst hopelessly biased.

  • K-12
(Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

A California high school has made millions of dollars from the initial public offering of shares in Snap Inc., the company behind the Snapchat photo messaging application.

The board of the Saint Francis High School in Mountain View agreed to invest $15,000 in seed money in Snap in 2012, when the company was just getting started.

Jordan Downs Housing Development in Watts
Jordan Downs Housing Development in Watts (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

The Los Angeles Unified School District has spent more than $1 million in the last three years cleaning lead and arsenic from the soil at David Starr Jordan High School in Watts.

Now the school district is suing the city’s housing authority to get those costs covered.

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Jordan High School
Jordan High School (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

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  • K-12
Kansas state Rep. Larry Campbell.
Kansas state Rep. Larry Campbell. (John Hanna / Associated Press)

The Kansas Supreme Court on Thursday ordered the state to increase its spending on public schools, but it didn't say by how much. 

The court gave legislators until the end of June to enact a new education funding law. 

  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12
  • For Parents
Last year, Costa Mesa students dressed up as their favorite characters.
Last year, Costa Mesa students dressed up as their favorite characters. (Daily Pilot)

Today is the 20th anniversary of Read Across America Day, a campaign the National Education Association organizes to celebrate literacy.

It's held every March 2, which is the birthday of the late Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss -- so it's also a celebration of his beloved children's books.

This year, LeVar Burton, the host of the PBS show "Reading Rainbow," along with Marley Dias, a 12-year-old advocate of diversity in literature who created #1000BlackGirlBooks.

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12
From left, Myrna Saint-Juste and her children, Marcus Millen and Mikaili Millen.
From left, Myrna Saint-Juste and her children, Marcus Millen and Mikaili Millen. (Myrna Saint-Juste)

Myrna Saint-Juste, of Orlando, Fla., voted for Hillary Clinton for president and disapproves of almost everything about President Trump, except his goal of making private and parochial schools more affordable.

Saint-Juste, a single mother, saved, scrimped and worked longer hours as an optician so she could afford the $500 a month to send her two children to St. Andrew Catholic School.

Trump is planning to visit St. Andrew on Friday, which has caused a small political divide. Sainte-Juste and her son, Marcus Millen, who graduated from the school, both were asked to speak to the president. Sainte-Juste said no, but Marcus, who is 16, said yes. 

Dianne Feinstein
Dianne Feinstein (Getty Images)

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