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1297 posts
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
(Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)

After they put pressure on officials of the Los Angeles Unified School District, charter school leaders last week won changes to the rules under which they operate.

Students, they say, will benefit. However, some district officials say that it is better for students that the charters did not get everything they wanted.

Here is a look at what the district agreed to change, where charters backed down, and what might happen next.

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  • K-12
(Gary Kazanjian / Associated Press)

California will restrict farmers' use of certain pesticides near schools and day-care centers under a new rule announced this week that regulators said is among the toughest in the U.S.

Under the new rule, California farmers will be prohibited from spraying pesticides within a quarter of a mile of public K-12 schools and licensed day-care centers from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. during the school week, the state Department of Pesticide Regulation said in a statement.

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  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • Community Colleges
(Christina House / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. Los Angeles will receive an $11.2-million grant from the U.S. Department of Education for tutoring and summer school.
  2. The L.A. Community College District signed an agreement with Loyola Marymount University to encourage more transfers and curricular continuity.

In California:

  1. The state's public colleges are trying to fix the transfer process.
  2. Hundreds of people spoke out before the Board of Education voted to approve new textbooks to satisfy the state's history social science guidelines.

Nationwide:

  1. Private colleges are expected to outpace public universities in tuition revenue growth for the first time in a decade.
  2. After some pushback, schools in Spokane, Wash., will not use Planned Parenthood's sex education curriculum.
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
Mayor Eric Garcetti announces a previous Promise Neighborhood grant at Berendo Middle School in January.
Mayor Eric Garcetti announces a previous Promise Neighborhood grant at Berendo Middle School in January. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles will receive an $11.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education for a program that helps local students with tutoring, summer classes and college-readiness preparation, officials announced Thursday.

The money will be used to provide help for about 2,000 students in 16 area schools stretching from East Hollywood to the northeast San Fernando Valley.

The schools are in Promise Zones or Promise Neighborhoods, designations that help impoverished areas receive federal funds for economic or educational uses.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • California State University
  • LAUSD
Liz Sanchez, center, a Cal State Fullerton second year graduate student and Fullerton College employee, at a rally to preserve DACA.
Liz Sanchez, center, a Cal State Fullerton second year graduate student and Fullerton College employee, at a rally to preserve DACA. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. Today is the last day to apply for school-choice programs within L.A. Unified.
  2. A new accredited culinary school will open in Pasadena next year.

In California:

  1. Cal State's trustees passed a resolution encouraging the CSU community to advocate for all their "Dreamers" — students, faculty and staff.
  2. The State Board of Education voted to change the way it interprets test scores on the California Dashboard, its new education rating tool.

Nationwide:

  1. Betsy DeVos visited schools in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
  2. The Republican tax bill includes a big break for parents sending their kids to private schools — if they are wealthy enough to put aside large amounts of money in advance.
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Los Angeles Unified School District students at Harris Newmark High School
Los Angeles Unified School District students at Harris Newmark High School (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

The California State Board of Education voted unanimously on a controversial proposal to change how test scores translate into ratings for schools and school districts.

The vote Wednesday followed a long discussion about whether the state's statistical design group works in secret, and whether the change might mislead parents.

The change would be made to the California School Dashboard, a new education rating tool unveiled in preview form this year. It’s supposed to provide a more holistic sense of how a school is doing.

  • Higher Education
  • California State University
(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

California State University’s board of trustees unanimously passed a resolution Wednesday encouraging leaders of the nation’s largest public university system and each of its 23 campuses to support and advocate for the continued protection of their 8,300 “Dreamer” students and hundreds more faculty and staff members.

Chancellor Timothy P. White urged the trustees to take a public stand at their meeting in Long Beach.

  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • California State University
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. Charter school advocates won some concessions from L.A. Unified on Tuesday
  2. State and local officials are investigating an oil spill a block away from a school
  3. Three UCLA basketball players were reportedly involved in a shoplifting incident in China

In California:

  1. What we're watching at this week's California State Board of Education meeting
  2. Cal State faculty tell trustees that they feel too rushed by a plan to loosen course requirements by next fall

Nationwide:

  1. People who oppose school vouchers won seats in a closely-watched school board race in Douglas County, Colo.
  2. How the GOP tax bill could hit graduate students very hard
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  • Higher Education
  • California State University
Cal State Chancellor Timothy P. White
Cal State Chancellor Timothy P. White (Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times)

Cal State faculty members lined up at the microphone at the board of trustees meeting Tuesday to express their concerns about executive orders aimed at helping students graduate sooner by dropping noncredit remedial classes and loosening math requirements.

They said they were worried about the speed of the changes, which campuses are supposed to institute by next fall. They said they hadn’t been given enough time to weigh in on how best to make the transition, and that rushing might jeopardize educational quality.

Officials are concerned that too many schools that saw only small changes would be categorized as red.
Officials are concerned that too many schools that saw only small changes would be categorized as red. (California State Board of Education meeting agenda)

After seeing this year’s standardized test scores, state education officials want to change the way those scores translate to school ratings — in a way that likely would make more schools look better.

The statisticians and administrators advocating for the change say it’s necessary as they calibrate the state’s new color-coded school accountability system.

The California State Board of Education will take up this issue — and other proposed changes — in its meeting Wednesday. But what officials call a technical tweak, education advocates see as a lowering of expectations for California’s students.