Advertisement
1263 posts
  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
Students at Bethune-Cookman University booed and turned their backs while Donald Trump's education chief Betsy DeVos gave a commencement speech on Wednesday.

The contents of Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' commencement speech Wednesday at Bethune-Cookman University, a historically black college in Daytona Beach, Fla., was pretty standard: Listen to people who disagree with you, serve your country, and give back.

But the reception was raucous. Students booed and turned their backs while President Trump's Education chief spoke.

DeVos delivered her speech even after students used social media and online petitions to try to prevent her appearance.

Advertisement
Leah Bell died when a personal watercraft crashed into a boat she was on in Copenhagen.
Leah Bell died when a personal watercraft crashed into a boat she was on in Copenhagen. (Courtesy of Pomona College)

Two students — Leah Bell from Pomona College and Linsey Malia from Stonehill College in Massachusetts — were killed Saturday in Copenhagen when a personal watercraft struck the boat they were in, officials said.

Five other students in a study-abroad program were injured in the crash, according to DIS Study Abroad in Scandinavia. The program’s students were on a boating excursion to celebrate the final weeks of their semester abroad.

“This is tragic news for Leah’s family, friends and for our entire community,” Pomona College said in a statement.

Advertisement
  • K-12
  • HS Insider
(McKenna Thurber / HS Insider)

McKenna Thurber, a skater and a junior at El Camino Real Charter, writes about skateboarding's deep roots in Southern California. 

On the blistering, dirty and cracked streets of Southern California, it is difficult to avoid skateboards.

It is not unusual to see toddlers, enveloped in protective padding, learning how to skate in their front yard on weekends. On campuses, stairwells and cafeterias become ramps and obstacles. Each afternoon, groups of students are seen skating home from school.

  • For Parents
(Netflix)

Since the drama series “13 Reasons Why” debuted March 31 on Netflix, hundreds of school districts across the country have sent letters home advising parents that their kids may be watching a show that some mental health experts argue glamorizes suicide. Due to the graphic depictions of suicide, rape, bullying, slut shaming and drunk driving, the National Assn. of School Psychologists has recommended “that vulnerable youth, especially those who have any degree of suicidal ideation,” do not view the series.

We reached out to U.S. educators to get their thoughts. With so many teenagers creating memes and tweeting about the series, we wanted to find out how the show was actually being discussed IRL.

(Alex Wong / Getty Images)

The time has come for the California State Board of Education to formulate its plan for satisfying the Every Student Succeeds Act, the Obama-era replacement of No Child Left Behind. This change will be the major topic of discussion at the board meeting on Wednesday and Thursday.

Where No Child used a stringent system to reward and punish schools for their performance on test scores, ESSA, as it's known, gives states much more leeway in deciding how to hold schools accountable for good performance. 

With the Trump administration in office — and an Education secretary who insists that states and school districts do much of the decision-making — states will get even more freedom than they had expected. Trump in March signed a bill that trashed Obama's rules for ESSA state compliance.

Advertisement
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

The Los Angeles school board on Tuesday unanimously approved a set of policies that board members said would provide families with a higher level of protection from federal immigration raids.

Among the safeguards in the sweeping set of guidelines: No immigration officers will be allowed on campus without clearance from the superintendent of schools, who will consult with district lawyers. Until that happens, they won’t be let in, even if they arrive with a legally valid subpoena.

  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
(Christina House / For The Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide: 

  • Higher Education
(Morehouse College / 20th Century Fox)

On a red clay hill in the heart of Atlanta, hundreds of black men saunter up and down Morehouse College’s Brown Street on their way to classes. It’s a late March afternoon and the magnolia trees, fuchsia and white pansies bloom into a sweet, tea-tinged breeze.

To the unfamiliar eye, Morehouse seems like many other colleges. But it’s not.

Most schools are not used as filming locations for big-budget Hollywood productions. Morehouse, however, has been the setting for two in just a single year, the Oscar-nominated “Hidden Figures” and BET’s “The Quad.”

Advertisement
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
L.A. schools Supt. Michelle King
L.A. schools Supt. Michelle King (Al Seib/Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles school officials on Tuesday pulled back from a plan to quickly install a one-stop online student enrollment system in the nation’s second-largest school system.

The apparent problem was that Supt. Michelle King didn’t have a solid majority on the Board of Education to approve the purchase of the necessary technology. As a result, officials quietly removed a vote on the $24-million, three-year contract from the agenda just before the meeting.

The effort to match families with academic programs and draw in new enrollment has become a major early initiative of King, who took office about 15 months ago. She would like some features of the enrollment system ready by the fall. That timeline is now in doubt.

  • Higher Education
  • University of California
Students at UC Berkeley's Moffitt Library
Students at UC Berkeley's Moffitt Library (David Butow / For The Times)

The University of California, aiming to end fighting over how many out-of-state students it admits, on Tuesday announced a revised proposal to limit non-Californian and international undergraduates.

Under the proposal, UC would restrict the percentage of nonresident students to 18% at five of its nine undergraduate campuses. UC BerkeleyUCLAUC San Diego and UC Irvine — whose proportion of nonresident students exceeds 18% — would be allowed to keep, but not increase, those higher percentages.

The new plan is a retreat from the proposal for a 20% systemwide cap on nonresident students that university officials presented to the UC Board of Regents in March. The cap, which would have been the first of it its kind, drew so much dissension from faculty and lawmakers that it was pulled from action and a vote was delayed until this month.