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(Richard Winton / Los Angeles Times)

A 22-year-old immigration activist and college student was detained by federal authorities Thursday, less than a month after her mother was taken into custody by federal agents during a massive cocaine bust in Los Angeles.

Claudia Rueda was detained while moving her family’s car outside their Boyle Heights home and was being held by the U.S. Border Patrol at a facility near San Diego late Thursday, according to her attorney, Monika Langarica.

Rueda played a central role in advocating on behalf of her mother, Teresa Vidal-Jaime, who was cleared of involvement in the drugs seized during the cocaine bust, but was held for several weeks in federal custody. Despite the objections of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Vidal-Jaime was granted bail and released May 12.

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(Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles’ teachers union, for decades a dominant political force in school district politics, suffered a crushing defeat this week that speaks to a larger power shift away from labor and toward the growth of the well-heeled charter school movement.

One widely expected outcome is that charter schools will continue to grow in number and influence. That could benefit students and families looking for alternatives to their local public schools. But because most charter schools are not unionized, their growth threatens the teachers union — and possibly other local public-employee unions.

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
(Jae C. Hong / Associated Press)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)

University of California regents on Thursday approved the first limit on out-of-state and international student enrollment, settling for now a prolonged fight over who gets admitted to the prestigious public research university.

Regents voted to cap nonresident undergraduate enrollment to 18% at UC Davis, UC Santa Barbara, UC Santa Cruz, UC Riverside and UC Merced. Four campuses that already exceed that level — UCLA, UC Berkeley, UC San Diego and UC Irvine — will be allowed to keep but not increase the higher percentage they enroll in 2017-18.

Nonresidents currently make up 16.5% of the system's 210,170 undergraduates. 

  • K-12
  • HS Insider
(Daniel Hermosisima / West High Chieftain)

As West (Torrance) High School junior Omar Rashad assesses higher education, he sees the value in starting at community college. 

Ever since National College Decision Day on May 1, high school seniors have been tooting their own horns, bragging about the colleges that have accepted them. Students who were admitted into universities like UCLA, UC Berkeley or any of the other prestigious undergraduate schools in California are often celebrated, but there is a large portion of high school students left out of the limelight.

This is the case mostly because of these students’ plans to take a wiser and more economical route to higher education, which means transferring after two years of community college into the UC or CSU school systems. Yes, there is not much to brag about when you are going to El Camino or Santa Monica Community College, because after all, it is not Stanford, but what matters is the end result.

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California

What a difference a venue makes.

When state Auditor Elaine Howle told a joint legislative committee this month that University of California central administrators had amassed a $175-million undisclosed surplus and interfered in her audit, lawmakers cried foul. One compared UC administrators to corrupt officials in the city of Bell. Others asked whether administrators had committed any crimes and should be subpoenaed. One legislator called for the resignation of UC President Janet Napolitano.

But UC regents struck a markedly different tone when Howle came to talk about the audit at their meeting Thursday in San Francisco. Regents thanked her profusely for her work and said they would implement all 33 of her recommended reforms. Last week, they unanimously approved the hiring of an outside investigator to help uncover facts about the interference of central administrators in confidential surveys sent by auditors to campuses 

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
UC President Janet Napolitano
UC President Janet Napolitano (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

  • K-12
  • Charter Schools
Nick Melvoin
Nick Melvoin (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

On election day, when Nick Melvoin, 31, and Kelly Gonez, 28, won seats on the seven-member L.A. Unified school board, they formed its first-ever pro-charter majority. They did so with the backing of groups funded by wealthy charter school supporters, who spent more than $9 million on the campaigns.

A day after the election, the outcome was still sending tremors through the region’s education community. Many skeptics wondered if, after years of suing the school district and rallying parents to protest at board meetings, charter school advocates and the candidates they backed are prepared to lead the nation’s second-largest school district.

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  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

On a shaded Westside street nestled just below the curve where the 10 meets the 405, two different visions of how to teach students in Los Angeles sit side by side.

Daniel Webster Middle School is a traditional public school. At the edge of the campus, past a small parking lot, sits Magnolia Science Academy 4, a charter school.

This has been the way of L.A. schools in recent years as charters have expanded at a rapid clip. But Tuesday’s watershed election — which gave charter school supporters their first majority on the Los Angeles Board of Education — could accelerate that growth. 

  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(Teresa Watanabe / Los Angeles Times)

A stinging state audit of University of California budget operations cast a long shadow over a UC regents meeting Wednesday, as students and union members chastised officials for raising tuition while squirreling away millions.

On Thursday, State Auditor Elaine Howle will talk to the regents about her findings that the UC Office of the President failed to disclose $175 million in surplus funds, paid excessive salaries and inappropriately interfered in campuses’ replies to her auditors’ confidential surveys.