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(Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)

The California Department of Education is delaying the release of state standardized test scores. 

The Department was preparing to release the results of the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress early next week, on Aug. 29. 

But on Friday, department spokesman Bill Ainsworth said the release was delayed indefinitely. "Release of the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) test results for 2017 will be postponed to address a recently identified data issue," he said in an email. 

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  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • California State University
(Gregory D. Cook / Cal State Bakersfield)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. A federal report finds that Occidental College is now complying with the Clery Act, a crime-reporting law.
  2. Cal State Bakersfield President Horace Mitchell will retire.
  3. A caretaker and a parent are suing a Pasadena principal, claiming he threatened them with immigration enforcement.

In California:

  1. A group of East Coast experts thinks California's plan to satisfy the Every Student Succeeds Act is lacking in detail.
  2. As part of its efforts to double graduation rates, Cal State no longer will require a strict intermediate algebra prerequisite for all of its general math courses.

Nationwide:

  1. Blacks and Latinos are more underrepresented at elite colleges than they were 35 years ago.
  2. An Alabama school board member is in trouble for suggesting that special education students be removed from certain schools so that their scores don't bring the averages down.
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(Christina House / For The Times)

California’s proposed plan to satisfy a major federal education law is falling short, according to a new report.

While the report by the Boston-based nonprofit Bellwether Education Partners praises the state’s plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act by using multiple signs of student performance and employing up-to-date tests, it highlights the plan’s lack of detail about how it will identify and help low-performing schools.

  • Higher Education
(Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Occidental College previously fell short in “numerous, serious, persistent and systemic” ways in reporting sexual assaults and other crimes on or near campus, but the school since has made changes and is now in compliance with a federal crime-reporting law, the U.S. Department of Education has concluded.

In a report released this week, federal investigators found that from 2009 to 2013, administrators at the Eagle Rock liberal arts school violated multiple mandates of the Clery Act, which requires colleges to report campus crime statistics each year. The violations included a failure to accurately compile and disclose crime statistics, issue timely warnings of potential safety threats, maintain accurate daily crime logs and provide necessary crime-prevention information to students, employees and parents.

  • Higher Education
  • California State University
(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Cal State no longer will require all its general education math courses to have a strict intermediate algebra prerequisite — a policy that has long stymied students trying to transfer from community colleges and freshmen forced to prove they know how to factor trinomials, graph exponential functions and apply other abstract concepts they might rarely use in everyday life.

Under the new policy, which goes into effect next fall, students will be able to complete Cal State’s general math/quantitative reasoning requirement without intermediate algebra by enrolling in courses such as personal finance, game theory, statistics and computer science.

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  • Higher Education
  • California State University
(Gregory D. Cook / Cal State Bakersfield)

Cal State Bakersfield President Horace Mitchell, who expanded enrollment and turned the Central Valley campus into an NCAA Division I athletics school, announced Thursday that he will retire at the end of the academic year.

“It has been my great honor and privilege to serve with you, our outstanding faculty, staff and administrators, in serving our students and community over the past 13 years,” Mitchell said during his annual University Day address to the campus community. “We have been dedicated to inspiring excellence among our students and transforming their lives.”

  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • HS Insider

We love to hear from the student reporters in our HS Insider program. They're in the schools. They know what's going on in them. We asked them to tell us how they felt about heading back to school this year and to weigh in on a recent story we did about the deep cleaning of area schools

Here's a video report from Tina Takhmazyan and Anthony Gharib of Hoover High in the Glendale Unified School District.  We hope they'll send us more reports throughout the year.

  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(USC)

When William Shakespeare penned “Hamlet” around the turn of the 17th century, he probably never imagined his words would one day grace the base of a statue at USC as part of a $700-million project.

Likewise, how was he to imagine that the spelling of his name would ignite a cross-town debate between two famed Los Angeles universities? Did the Bard spell his name Shakespeare or Shakespear?

That last question was asked recently when USC unveiled the new statue of Hecuba, queen of Troy, last week. The statue featured verses from “Hamlet” and the dramatist’s name, which was noticeably missing a final “e.”

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California
New UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol speaks during this year's convocation.
New UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol speaks during this year's convocation. (David Butow/For The Times)

Carol T. Christ, UC Berkeley's new chancellor, is putting free speech front and center.

On the day she welcomed 9,500 new students to campus, she announced the start of a free speech year at Berkeley — with activities designed to focus on the importance of our rights to express ourselves.

On Wednesday, she sent a message to students, faculty and staff expounding on that idea in the wake of "events in Charlottesville, with their racism, bigotry, violence and mayhem."

  • Higher Education
  • California State University

Cal State Los Angeles was awarded $16.6 million to bring dental care to underserved communities in the Greater Los Angeles area, officials said Tuesday, billing the state grant as the largest in the university’s history.

The school was one of 15 agencies awarded funding from the California Department of Health Care Services to create programs to improve access to dental care over the next four years for the roughly 5 million children enrolled in the Denti-Cal program.