Advertisement
1292 posts
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

California's data-related delay in the release of its state standardized test scores is due to a mix-up in some special education students' scores, an official said Tuesday.

The results of the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress were initially scheduled to be released Tuesday.

Late last Friday, the California Department of Education said the results would be delayed indefinitely due to a data issue. The obvious question was, what sort of data issue?

Advertisement
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
(Los Angeles Times)

The concept sounds simple: Take a good school, figure out what’s happening to make students successful, and re-create those elements to spread the success somewhere else.

Replication, as this process is called, has become a buzzword with charter schools nationwide as they expand their networks on the promise of bringing high achievement at existing schools to new ones.

Could the idea work for public schools? The Los Angeles Unified School District has a chance to find out.

Advertisement
  • Higher Education
  • University of California

UC Berkeley’s chief counsel was killed Sunday in a hit-and-run crash while bicycling in Sonoma County, authorities said.

Christopher Patti was struck and killed by a driver in a BMW who lost control as he entered a curve on California 116 in Guerneville, according to the California Highway Patrol.

  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
  • Charter Schools
(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
(Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)

Last week, some of the city's most prominent people debated a proposed science and math school sponsored and overseen by the state.

Discussion of whether or not to back it caused the first major divide on the newly configured L.A. Unified School District Board of Education, at its first public meeting of substance. The debate also suggested that the politics of a divisive May school board election will continue to play out in the nation’s second-largest school system.

Advertisement
(Terrence Antonio James / Chicago Tribune)

As project manager for the advocacy organization End Rape on Campus, Chardonnay Madkins, 25, is working to bring more attention to the role race can play in the handling of campus sexual assaults, and the distinct difficulties black women can face.

She is also preparing to launch Centering the Margin, a program that will help school officials and students recognize how sexual assaults can affect members of marginalized communities differently.

(Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)

The California Department of Education is delaying the release of state standardized test scores. 

The Department was preparing to release the results of the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress early next week, on Aug. 29. 

But on Friday, department spokesman Bill Ainsworth said the release was delayed indefinitely. "Release of the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) test results for 2017 will be postponed to address a recently identified data issue," he said in an email. 

  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • California State University
(Gregory D. Cook / Cal State Bakersfield)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

Advertisement
(Christina House / For The Times)

California’s proposed plan to satisfy a major federal education law is falling short, according to a new report.

While the report by the Boston-based nonprofit Bellwether Education Partners praises the state’s plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act by using multiple signs of student performance and employing up-to-date tests, it highlights the plan’s lack of detail about how it will identify and help low-performing schools.

  • Higher Education
(Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Occidental College previously fell short in “numerous, serious, persistent and systemic” ways in reporting sexual assaults and other crimes on or near campus, but the school since has made changes and is now in compliance with a federal crime-reporting law, the U.S. Department of Education has concluded.

In a report released this week, federal investigators found that from 2009 to 2013, administrators at the Eagle Rock liberal arts school violated multiple mandates of the Clery Act, which requires colleges to report campus crime statistics each year. The violations included a failure to accurately compile and disclose crime statistics, issue timely warnings of potential safety threats, maintain accurate daily crime logs and provide necessary crime-prevention information to students, employees and parents.