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1297 posts
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
L.A. Unified superintendent Michelle King
L.A. Unified superintendent Michelle King (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. L.A. Unified superintendent Michelle King is out on medical leave.
  2. The district's enrollment fell short of expectations — and fewer students means less money from the state.

In California:

  1. A new poll finds that most Californians support increasing state-funded financial aid.
  2. Nine Orange County schools were shut down because of the fire in Anaheim Hills. Officials reported at least 14 school closures across seven counties in Northern California.

Nationwide:

  1. Schools in Florida are resegregating, according to UCLA research.
  2. One in every 10 students in the nation's largest public school system was homeless at some point last school year.
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  • Higher Education
(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

USC administrator responsible for raising hundreds of millions of dollars for the university has left his post in the wake of allegations that he sexually harassed female colleagues, the latest blow to a campus already dealing with the arrest of an assistant basketball coach and the departures of two medical school deans accused of misconduct.

David Carrera, a university vice president who helped lead USC’s historic $6-billion fundraising campaign, is the subject of an internal university investigation in which dozens of employees have been interviewed about his treatment of women, university officials confirmed Tuesday in response to inquiries from The Times.

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(Tina Takhmazyan / HS Insider)

Tina Takhmazyan, a junior at Hoover High School, grew up obsessed with ballet. Then she had an accident. 

I just thought my life wasn’t exciting enough.

I read about it in books and articles, see it in documentaries and movies; people who do the impossible and get an article published or movie made in their honor. I was inspired, but not truly touched because I could never understand what it really felt like to have everything you loved ripped away from you because of something you couldn’t control. Then, I did.

  • K-12
  • LAUSD
(Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Enrollment has dropped even more than anticipated in the Los Angeles Unified School District, exacerbating budget problems and signaling that efforts to reverse the decline are falling short.

L.A. Unified had been expecting enrollment to shrink 2.1%, but the actual drop has been 2.55%. That small percentage difference translates to about 5,400 students, said Scott Price, chief financial officer for L.A. Unified.

  • K-12
(Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

Eighteen years after lawmakers agreed that California high school students should prove their skills on a final exam before earning diplomas, Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation Tuesday to permanently repeal the requirement.

The move comes two years after Brown and lawmakers imposed a three-year suspension of the law, which would have expired next spring. It marks the final chapter of a law that was originally promised to ensure students should be able to prove a series of basic reading and math skills before graduating.

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  • K-12
  • LAUSD
(Christina House / Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles schools chief Michelle King is recuperating from surgery and has appointed a subordinate to run the school system in her stead.

In an email over the weekend, she told senior staff that Associate Supt. Vivian Ekchian would serve as acting superintendent “for the remainder of my absence.”

The district has not discussed King’s medical problems, but some insiders said she injured herself in an accident while on vacation with her family. Whatever the details, she was apparently suffering from severe leg pain, which ultimately required surgery, said district sources, who could not be named because they were not authorized to discuss the matter.

(Jorge Reyes Salinas)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. When Ref Rodriguez ran for the L.A. school board, three janitors vouched for him in campaign mailers. They also appear on prosecutors' list of campaign donors he allegedly illegal reimbursed.  
  2. Marlborough School, a private girls school, settled a case with Chelsea Burkett, who was abused by her English teacher.

In California:

  1. Meet Cal State student trustee Jorge Reyes Salinas, a Peruvian immigrant and DACA recipient who didn't understand what his lack of legal status meant until high school.
  2. The state has beefed up the online tools it uses to track how many high school seniors complete and submit college financial aid applications.

Nationwide: 

  1. The Trump administration's hard-line immigration demands could kill prospects for a DACA deal. 
  2. How America's schools are working to accommodate Puerto Rican hurricane refugees.
(Pro-Rodriguez campaign mailer)

When Ref Rodriguez ran for his seat on the Los Angeles school board, opponents accused him of underpaying the lowest-wage workers at the charter-school group he helped found.

His supporters quickly countered with testimonials on mailers — from three of the charter schools’ janitors.

These janitors who so wholeheartedly backed their boss also are connected to the criminal case now plaguing the school board member — who has been charged with three felonies and more than two dozen misdemeanors.

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My mother, me at 2, my father and a family friend
My mother, me at 2, my father and a family friend (handout)

My parents don’t remember exactly when they told me. But I do.

I was 8 or 9 years old. My teacher gave me a pamphlet about a school trip to Washington.

At dinner that night in my family’s Mid-City apartment, I told my parents I really wanted to go and experience my nation’s capital. At first, my mother danced around the request, focusing on how much it would cost. But eventually, she grew more serious.

  • Higher Education
  • California State University

When Jorge Reyes Salinas was 10, his parents cobbled together enough money to leave Peru to start a new life in Los Angeles. They wanted a better future for their only son, who thought he was going to Disneyland.

Reyes Salinas didn’t understand what his lack of legal status meant until, as a sophomore in high school, he was encouraged to enroll in advanced classes at a local community college. The forms asked for a Social Security number, which he did not have.

State support made it possible for him to attend the one university he applied to: Cal State Northridge. Because he couldn’t qualify for any federal financial aid, he went by bus to a machine shop after class each day and worked 30 to 40 hours a week.