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1265 posts
  • For Parents
(Win McNamee / Getty Images)

As violence erupted in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday, with three killed and dozens injured around one of the largest white nationalist rallies in a decade, TV screens and news feeds across America were filled with images of chaos and terror.

While politicians including Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Sen. Dianne Feinstein reacted by condemning the attacks, calling for “hope and prayers for peace” and reminders that “violent acts of hate and bigotry have no place in America,” parents seeing the news were faced with a dilemma that’s becoming an increasing concern for American families: whether, and how, to talk about violence and racism with their children.

Mental health experts and parents discussed their experiences Saturday, and shared advice for talking to children about the violence in Charlottesville. Here are their tips:

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  • K-12
  • HS Insider
(McKenna Thurber / HS Insider)

HS Insider summer intern McKenna Thurber explored the rising punk scene in the San Fernando Valley.

In the back alley of a small music venue in the San Fernando Valley, Jack Zisfain showed off his favorite jacket.

The piece’s thick, leather base was difficult to glimpse through his collection of buttons, 34 to be exact, including one decorated with a caricature spider. It read: “Don’t bug me.”

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

  • Higher Education
USC's Marlon Tuipulotu, who has been impressive during spring practices, is competing for a spot at nose tackle.
USC's Marlon Tuipulotu, who has been impressive during spring practices, is competing for a spot at nose tackle. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

Life on the offensive line is marked by cadence, timing and rhythm — snap, step, hit. 

The tune is bluesy, a little country, and it lilts at odd hours through the apartment complex most of the linemen share, from an acoustic guitar strummed by the Trojans’ left guard, Chris Brown.

USC must replace three starting linemen from a season ago, and inserting newcomers requires more than individual skill. All five must march to the same beat.

  • K-12
  • HS Insider
(Photo provided by Kelly Yang)

HS Insider summer intern Sarah Kim explored how media helps biracial Asians identify with their culture.

Sometimes you can’t see someone’s race by looking at the color of their skin. I used to think that it was hard to fit in in America as an Asian, but I recently noticed that my difficulties as a Korean are nothing compared to those of biracial Asians.

I grew up with friends and family members who never felt accepted by any community or culture. As biracial Americans, they always felt too light or too dark, too Asian or too European. This is an experience familiar to many biracial Americans, who express that they feel out of place in the communities their heritage makes them a part of.

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  • Betsy DeVos
(Alex Brandon / Associated Press)

After barely surviving her confirmation battle and facing sporadic protests during visits to schools, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos could hardly have teed up a more fraught, emotional and divisive issue to launch her tenure: campus sexual assault.

There’s a virtual race to gain DeVos’ ear as she gathers information for what might be an overhaul of the Obama administration’s rules.

(Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP)

For years, David Binkle was hailed as a pioneer among school nutrition advocates for accomplishing a near-herculean task — using produce and meats provided by local growers to greatly reduce the number of fatty meals served in the nation’s second-largest school district.

But as he was revolutionizing meals for Los Angeles Unified School District students, prosecutors allege, Binkle illegally funneled about $65,000 of the district’s money into a private consulting firm he ran, then placed some of that money into his own pocket. The 55-year-old appeared in court on Tuesday and pleaded not guilty to 15 felony counts including embezzlement and misappropriation of public funds. 

  • University of California

UC Irvine police were increasing patrols around university apartments Tuesday night after a man tried to kidnap a female student earlier in the day.

About 5:40 a.m., a man in a blue Toyota RAV4 pulled up to the student, who was walking near a university housing complex in the 200 block of Arroyo Drive, and asked if she needed a ride home, UCI officials said. She told him she did not.

The driver then told the student he had a gun. “He wanted her to get in the car,” UCI spokesman Tom Vasich said

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  • K-12
  • LAUSD
(Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP)

The man credited with leading an initiative that brought healthier meals to Los Angeles’ public school students has been charged with embezzlement, forgery and mismanagement of funds, prosecutors said Tuesday.

David Binkle, the district’s 52-year-old former food services director, was charged last week with multiple counts of misappropriation of public funds, embezzlement of public funds, conflict of interest, forgery and perjury, according to a statement issued by the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office.

Binkle, whose work reducing the sodium and fat intakes of students in the country’s second-largest school district won praise from former First Lady Michelle Obama, is accused of siphoning roughly $65,000 worth of Los Angeles Unified School District funds to a culinary club he ran, according to prosecutors.

(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

With her contract extended until 2020, L.A. Unified Supt. Michelle King laid out her priorities Tuesday morning in her State of the District speech, repeatedly mentioning her goal of 100% graduation.

The speech, delivered this year at Garfield High School in East L.A., is an annual tradition. The event is part pep rally for the 1,500 administrators in the audience who will begin a new school year on Aug. 15, and part political performance.