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  • For Parents
(Win McNamee / Getty Images)

As violence erupted in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday, with three killed and dozens injured around one of the largest white nationalist rallies in a decade, TV screens and news feeds across America were filled with images of chaos and terror.

While politicians including Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Sen. Dianne Feinstein reacted by condemning the attacks, calling for “hope and prayers for peace” and reminders that “violent acts of hate and bigotry have no place in America,” parents seeing the news were faced with a dilemma that’s becoming an increasing concern for American families: whether, and how, to talk about violence and racism with their children.

Mental health experts and parents discussed their experiences Saturday, and shared advice for talking to children about the violence in Charlottesville. Here are their tips:

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
Schools across California are using new science standards that emphasize hands-on learning.
Schools across California are using new science standards that emphasize hands-on learning. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

L.A. Unified and its labor unions have reached a tentative deal on healthcare.

Ben Austin, an L.A.-based education activist, is creating a new school accountability campaign focused on LAUSD.

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The University of California is proposing to raise tuition and the student services fee for state residents by 2.7%, an increase of $342 to a total of $12,972 for the 2018-19 academic year.

The budget proposal, which UC regents are set to consider Wednesday, would mark the second consecutive tuition increase after a freeze of several years. Nonresident students would pay an additional $978 in supplemental tuition, bringing their total to $28,992.

UCLA fraternities no longer can host parties with alcohol at their houses, the university's student-led Interfraternity Council announced Wednesday.

A collection of fraternity leaders "self-proposed an indefinite ban on events involving alcohol that take place within IFC chapter facilities," and approved it unanimously Tuesday, according to a statement from UCLA's Interfraternity Council Executive Board.

California is headed toward another standoff with the federal government — this time, over education.

The U.S. Department of Education, led by Betsy DeVos, had told the state that its plan to satisfy a major education law had significant flaws. On Thursday, the California State Board of Education voted to send a revised version of that plan, still missing an important component, back to Washington.

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
UCLA has new rules for fraternity parties.
UCLA has new rules for fraternity parties. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

Melanie Lundquist, a philanthropist from Palos Verdes Estates, stood in the hall near the principal's office at Santee Education Complex near downtown Los Angeles.

Jaden Pitts, a 17-year-old senior from South L.A., happened to be walking by. He is a Lundquist fellow, which means he's no slouch. The young man has served as student body treasurer, was a member of the committee that chose the current Santee principal, plays guard on the basketball team, runs sprints on his track team, and started a campus club — Brothers and Hermanos — to explore why male students lag behind females in school performance.

Every year, the California Department of Education and many of its school districts boast about record-high graduation rates.

But a federal audit raises questions about the accuracy of the local and statewide numbers.

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Esperanza Hernandez, left, and Teagan Garcia use Chromebooks in Joanie Bryant's class at Waggoner Elementary School in Winters.
Esperanza Hernandez, left, and Teagan Garcia use Chromebooks in Joanie Bryant's class at Waggoner Elementary School in Winters. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12
(Erik Lesser / European Pressphoto Agency)

Less than a month after Betsy DeVos’ U.S. Department of Education sent California a scathing critique of its educational plans, state officials must decide just how defiant they want to be.

The December letter from Washington asked the state to resubmit its plan for satisfying the Every Student Succeeds Act. The California State Board of Education will discuss an updated draft at this week’s meeting, which starts Thursday morning.

President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in 2015 to replace the No Child Left Behind Act. Where No Child took a punitive, test-score-based approach to rating schools, ESSA gives states more agency to design their own systems. 

  • Higher Education
  • California State University
  • University of California
UC Merced Chancellor Dorothy Leland, from left, and student Boe Mendewala meet with U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris and Whittier College representatives at the U.S. Capitol.
UC Merced Chancellor Dorothy Leland, from left, and student Boe Mendewala meet with U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris and Whittier College representatives at the U.S. Capitol. (UC Merced)

UC Merced doctoral student Boe Mendewala dreams of helping the world as a scientist specializing in solar energy. But she fears she won’t be able to finish her studies, continue as a teaching assistant or launch a career in the United States unless Congress renews DACA.

On Wednesday, the 27-year-old lobbied lawmakers in Washington to extend the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which has helped thousands of young immigrants like herself study and work without threat of deportation.

She and UC Merced Chancellor Dorothy Leland met with U.S. Reps. Jim Costa (D-Fresno) and Jeff Denham (R-Turlock), as well as U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris and staff members of fellow California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein. 

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