Advertisement
1293 posts
  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
Tony Thurmond and Marshall Tuck
Tony Thurmond and Marshall Tuck (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press; Damian Dovarganes / Associated Press)

In and around Southern California:

Why L.A. Unified may face financial crisis even with a large surplus this year.

An outside task force released a report saying that the district’s spending in key areas is out of step with comparable school districts.

Advertisement
Just 31.9% of recent graduates meet requirements to enroll in a California public four-year university.
Just 31.9% of recent graduates meet requirements to enroll in a California public four-year university. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Former Los Angeles schools Supt. Michelle King made “100% graduation” her central goal for the nation’s second-largest school district. Now the school board president wants to up the ante — and, by 2023, have every student graduate meeting requirements to enroll in one of the state’s public four-year universities.

According to LAUSD board President Monica Garcia’s resolution, titled Realizing the Promise for All: Close the Gap by 2023, just 31.9% of recent graduates meet those requirements. The district currently allows students to graduate with D grades in the required classes instead of the minimum C grades that Cal State and the University of California require.

The board is scheduled to vote on the resolution Tuesday.

Advertisement

A woman and her boyfriend are expected to be sentenced Thursday for the torture and murder of an 8-year-old boy whose killing in 2013 provoked public outrage, prompted sweeping reform of Los Angeles County’s child welfare system, and led to unprecedented criminal charges against social workers who handled the child’s case.

The Los Angeles school district is out of step with similar school systems, spending more on teachers’ pay and health benefits and less on activities that could enhance student learning, according to a new report by an outside task force.

A former vice dean of USC’s Keck School of Medicine testified Tuesday that he feared the school’s then-dean, Dr. Carmen A. Puliafito, “could be doing drugs” and expressed concerns about his general well-being to the university’s No. 2 administrator before Puliafito abruptly left his job in 2016.

Advertisement

With more than half a billion dollars socked away for next school year, the Los Angeles Unified School District hardly seems just two years from financial ruin. It’s a scenario that is especially tough to swallow if you’re a low-wage worker seeking a raise or a teacher who wants smaller classes.

  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
Willow Bay, dean of the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, speaks at the commencement ceremony in May.
Willow Bay, dean of the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, speaks at the commencement ceremony in May. (Leon Bennett/Getty Images)

In and around Southern California:

Several USC deans have sent out messages trying to reassure students and faculty that the university is committed to changing in light of misconduct allegations against the university’s longtime gynecologist.

These are the stories of the gynecologist’s former patients.

Top administrators at USC are reaching out to students in the wake of misconduct allegations against the university’s longtime gynecologist, acknowledging failings and vowing reforms as they try to address growing outrage over the revelations.

Advertisement
It's harder to learn in the heat, research finds.
It's harder to learn in the heat, research finds. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Southern California:

Rick Caruso, owner of the Grove and other prominent shopping centers, has been elected to lead USC’s board of trustees.In his first act as chair, he announced an outside investigation of the conduct of longtime campus gynecologist Dr. George Tyndall and of “reporting failures.”

Around the state:

The University of Southern California’s board of trustees has elected mall magnate Rick Caruso to be the new chair of the board, giving fresh leadership as the university navigates a widening scandal involving a longtime campus gynecologist.