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  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
Arminta Street Elementary School parents protest.
Arminta Street Elementary School parents protest. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

Leaders of the union that represents most public school teachers in the Los Angeles Unified School District announced their support Thursday for a bill that would fundamentally change who has the power to open charter schools in California.

Senate Bill 808, introduced by Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia), sets the stage for another year of arguing over how to reshape the state’s charter school law.

If it were to be enacted, it would dismantle the system of appeals that allows charter schools denied authorization or renewal by their local school districts to seek approval from county boards of education or the State Board of Education. Instead, local school districts would have the first and last word on charter school petitions and renewals.

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.
President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. (Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

President Trump’s proposed budget would reduce education spending nationwide while boosting money for school vouchers and charter schools.

While most public school dollars come from states and districts, federal funds cover specific programs. Since California is the most populous state, it stands to lose the most money. 

This fiscal year, the federal government is expected to pay California $4.09 billion for K-12 programming and $4.3 billion for college programs, EdSource noted.

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.
President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. (Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

President Trump’s proposed budget would reduce education spending nationwide while boosting money for school vouchers and charter schools.

While most public school dollars come from states and districts, federal funds cover specific programs. Since California is the most populous state, it stands to lose the most money. 

This fiscal year, the federal government is expected to pay California $4.09 billion for K-12 programming and $4.3 billion for college programs, EdSource noted.

  • K-12
Students from Schurr High School in Montebello protest possible teacher layoffs on their campus.

Dozens of high school students got to Schurr High School in Montebello extra early Thursday morning, ready to defend their teachers. Armed with posters and chants, they marched before class to protest the school board's decision to give layoff notices to 333 district staff.

"Today is basically trying to show everyone in our community that what's happening in our school is not OK with us," said sophomore Andrea Adame.  “The students are hurt and ... they’ll do anything in their power to help any of our teachers."

At 7 a.m., she and about 100 other students chanted "Save our teachers" at the corner of Wilcox Avenue and Hay Street.

  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(Marcio Jose Sanchez / Associated Press)

University of California regents expressed an array of concerns Thursday over a controversial proposal to place a 20% systemwide limit on enrollment of undergraduates from other states and countries.

Regent Sherry Lansing fretted that the limit could deprive campuses with fewer out-of-state students of future opportunities to attract them and the extra tuition dollars they bring. Regent Eloy Ortiz Oakley said UC should first make a better case to the state about its funding needs, and Regent Gareth Elliott rejected adopting any policy at all.

But UC President Janet Napolitano reminded regents that state lawmakers won't release $18.5 million in additional funding until a limit is set. 

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(Marcio Jose Sanchez / Associated Press)

University of California regents expressed an array of concerns Thursday over a controversial proposal to place a 20% systemwide limit on enrollment of undergraduates from other states and countries.

Regent Sherry Lansing fretted that the limit could deprive campuses with fewer out-of-state students of future opportunities to attract them and the extra tuition dollars they bring. Regent Eloy Ortiz Oakley said UC should first make a better case to the state about its funding needs, and Regent Gareth Elliott rejected adopting any policy at all.

But UC President Janet Napolitano reminded regents that state lawmakers won't release $18.5 million in additional funding until a limit is set. 

  • K-12

California's new color-coded school ratings look like Trivial Pursuit pieces. Someone baked them up Wednesday for the launch. 

Because red is supposed to be the worst color on the Dashboard, we have some questions. Did anyone eat the red cookies? Do they taste the worst? Did the yellow ones taste average?

You can play around with the California School Dashboard here. Tell us what you think about the new tool — or about your education-themed baking projects.

  • K-12
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  • K-12
  • Higher Education
  • University of California

Carol T. Christ, the newly appointed chancellor of UC Berkeley, said Thursday she will focus on a multimillion-dollar budget deficit, the student housing crunch and undergraduate education to help the renowned public research university through its worst difficulties in 50 years.

Christ, who currently serves as Berkeley's executive vice chancellor and provost, spoke to reporters after University of California regents unanimously approved her selection at their meeting in San Francisco.

Christ, 72, will take the helm July 1, succeeding Nicholas Dirks, who announced his resignation last year following widespread criticism over his handling of sexual misconduct scandals, the budget deficit and his leadership style. Christ has been widely hailed by faculty, staff and students for her open, collaborative style.