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(AP Photo / Jeff Chiu)

UC Berkeley is under fire again for its handling of sexual misconduct allegations.

A new lawsuit alleges that university officials failed to properly respond to complaints that John Searle, an 84-year-old renowned philosophy professor, sexually assaulted his 24-year-old research associate last July and cut her pay when she rejected his advances, according to BuzzFeed News. The researcher, Joanna Ong, was then fired by a Searle associate in September, the lawsuit alleges. 

Last year, UC Berkeley was rocked by complaints that Chancellor Nicholas Dirks had failed to properly discipline three prominent faculty members found to have violated university rules against sexual misconduct. The furor contributed to the loss of campus confidence in Dirks, who subsequently announced his resignation.

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California
UC President Janet Napolitano
UC President Janet Napolitano (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

University of California President Janet Napolitano is headed to Mexico next week to reassure leaders there that the public research university remains committed to academic collaboration — even if some of it, such as climate change research, is at risk under the Trump administration.

In an interview Wednesday, Napolitano said she would build on the UC-Mexico Initiative she launched in 2014 despite President Trump’s plans to build a border wall, increase immigration enforcement and reduce federal research funding.

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  • Higher Education
Olga Perez Stable Cox
Olga Perez Stable Cox (File photo | Daily Pilot)

The Orange Coast College professor who made controversial comments about now-President Trump in a video recorded by a student during class last fall has declined to accept OCC's Faculty of the Year award, according to the college.

Human-sexuality professor Olga Perez Stable Cox was notified of the award last week, but she declined to accept and did not want to participate in related activities, said Doug Bennett, executive director of the Orange Coast College Foundation.

  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • California State University
  • LAUSD
The California State University Board of Trustees voted 11 to 8 Wednesday to increase tuition as a way to fill a looming gap in state funding. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. A former student of Chino High School was arrested after allegedly tweeting that his alma mater "needs a good shooting."
  2. L.A. Unified is telling kindergarteners that they have seats waiting for them at certain colleges. 

In California:

  1. Cal State trustees approved a tuition hike while students protested the meeting by shouting "Shame! Shame! Shame!"
  2. More on what those protesters said. 

Nationwide:

  1. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously to strengthen the rights of students with disabilities. The court ruled in favor of the parents of a Colorado boy with autism who left the public school system after his progress "essentially stalled."
  2. Washington, D.C. public schools have approved a new system for rating schools. Where California uses colors, D.C. will soon use stars.
(Universal Pictures)

The seeds for "Get Out," the $136-million-grossing comedy-horror film, were sown in school.

In a recent interview on NPR's "Fresh Air" with host Terry Gross,  the film's creator Jordan Peele said he first felt a sense of otherness and racial isolation when filling out the paperwork that came with standardized tests:

PEELE: I'd been taught from an early age that I was in the other category on the standardized tests. You know, I had to go down the checklist -- Caucasian, African American, Latino, Asian-Pacific Islander, and then, you know, at the bottom is other. So, you know, very early on I was taught, in a way, that I was somehow this anomaly. And, you know, it's hard. I might be too close to it to really be able to tell you how all of that went into the movie. But it very clearly did. It very clearly did.

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  • HS Insider
(Blake Atwell / HS Insider)

Nationally acclaimed high school point guard, Santa Monica native and Mater Dei star Spencer Freedman aims to be great in everything he does.

Freedman attended Santa Monica High School his freshman year, before transferring to national powerhouse Mater Dei. Last year, during his sophomore season, he won Trinity League MVP honors and was named to the Open Division's All CIF 1st team.

This year as a junior for Mater Dei, Freedman averaged 14.5 points and 5.5 assists per game, which was second in the Trinity League. Spencer also shot 47 percent from the field, good for third best in the Trinity. He was named to the All CIF Southern Section 1st team for a second straight season.

  • K-12
  • Higher Education
  • California State University
(Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times)

After a heated morning of debate and impassioned statements from students, professors and lawmakers, California State University’s Board of Trustees voted 11 to 8 on Wednesday to increase tuition as a way to fill a looming gap in state funding.

“I don’t bring this forward with an ounce of joy,” said Cal State Chancellor Timothy P. White, addressing the packed meeting chamber. “I bring it with necessity.”

Students stood up and shouted "Shameful!" and "Shame! Shame! Shame!"

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  • Higher Education
  • California State University
(J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press)

A unanimous Supreme Court strengthened the rights of nearly 7 million schoolchildren with disabilities Wednesday and did so by rejecting a lower standard set by Judge Neil M. Gorsuch.

The ruling, one of the most important of this term, came as President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee is wrapping up his third day of testimony before a Senate committee.