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Instead of test scores, about 125 students see "No Answer Document Received" online.
Instead of test scores, about 125 students see "No Answer Document Received" online. (Courtesy of Jewlz Fahn)

The company that administers the ACT college entrance exam is looking for about 125 tests that went missing after students took the test in April at University High School.

"We are working with the test center supervisor and the carrier (FedEx) to attempt to locate the package," ACT, Inc. spokesman Ed Colby said in an email. 

Meanwhile, he said, students will be able to retake the test for free this month or at any future date and will get refunds for the initial testing. If the old tests are found, they will be able to use whichever score is better on their college applications, Colby said.

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(WOWT-TV / Associated Press)

An 8-year-old girl and the rest of her soccer team were disqualified from a girls tournament in Nebraska because event organizers thought she was a boy.

Mili Hernandez thinks it’s because of her short haircut.

“They only did it because I look like a boy,” Hernandez told WOWT-TV News.

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(WOWT-TV / Associated Press)

An 8-year-old girl and the rest of her soccer team were disqualified from a girls tournament in Nebraska because event organizers thought she was a boy.

Mili Hernandez thinks it’s because of her short haircut.

“They only did it because I look like a boy,” Hernandez told WOWT-TV News.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
(Joe Burbank / TNS)

What exactly would a federal school voucher program look like, and would it fund schools that discriminate against students based on their gender, religion, race or sexual orientation?

That question was a major flash point — once again — on  Tuesday as senators in an appropriations subcommittee questioned U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) asked DeVos if any voucher program would follow anti-discrimination laws.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
(Joe Burbank / TNS)

What exactly would a federal school voucher program look like, and would it fund schools that discriminate against students based on their gender, religion, race or sexual orientation?

That question was a major flash point — once again — on  Tuesday as senators in an appropriations subcommittee questioned U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) asked DeVos if any voucher program would follow anti-discrimination laws.

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
Vanessa Tahay
Vanessa Tahay (Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

High school senior Vanessa Tahay, right, recites poetry with classmate Amandeep Kaur during the poetry slam competition at the Los Angeles Theater Center.
High school senior Vanessa Tahay, right, recites poetry with classmate Amandeep Kaur during the poetry slam competition at the Los Angeles Theater Center. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Vanessa Tahay is a poet, and at 18, considered among the best in the city. The high school senior has performed and competed not just in Los Angeles but in San Francisco and Washington.

When she is on stage, audiences often go silent. They also laugh, holler, cringe and cry.

  • Higher Education
Whittier College President Sharon Herzberger announced Monday that she plans to retire at the end of June 2018.
Whittier College President Sharon Herzberger announced Monday that she plans to retire at the end of June 2018. (Whittier College)

Whittier College President Sharon Herzberger, who expanded campus diversity and oversaw the school’s largest capital project, announced Monday that she will retire at the end of the next academic year.

“Serving as president of Whittier has been the highest honor of my professional life and there is no doubt that I will miss this college mightily when I leave,” Herzberger wrote in a letter to students, faculty, alumni and staff.

Herzberger, who took the post in 2005, has led Whittier through notable — sometimes difficult — changes. In April, school officials announced, to the shock and anger of students and faculty, that their affiliated law school would be closing. Whittier Law School has been struggling with low student achievement and has been hit by a nationwide decline in law school applicants. It will be the first fully accredited law school in the country to shut down in three decades.

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From left, Scott Jaschik, Greg Lukianoff, Judith Shapiro and Pranav Jandhyala serve on a panel at the Education Writers Assn.'s annual conference in Washington.
From left, Scott Jaschik, Greg Lukianoff, Judith Shapiro and Pranav Jandhyala serve on a panel at the Education Writers Assn.'s annual conference in Washington. (Rosanna Xia / Los Angeles Times)

Free speech has once again become a highly charged issue on college campuses, where protests frequently have interrupted, and in some cases halted, appearances by polarizing speakers.

At a lively panel last week during the Education Writers Assn.’s annual conference in the nation’s capital, free speech advocates and a UC Berkeley student leader debated who was at fault and what could be done.

Alt-right provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos’ tour of colleges across the country drew protesters off and on campus, and sparked violent clashes, including one in which a man was shot in Seattle. At Berkeley — birthplace of the Free Speech Movement 50 years ago — university officials canceled his scheduled appearance in February and later pulled the plug on a scheduled April visit by conservative commentator Ann Coulter, citing safety concerns.

  • Higher Education
  • California State University
  • University of California
USC student Xavier Garcia transferred from Sacramento City College and is the first in his family to attend college.
USC student Xavier Garcia transferred from Sacramento City College and is the first in his family to attend college. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Transferring into an elite private college is not easy. Princeton hasn’t taken a transfer in more than two decades, according to the latest data from the National Center for Education Statistics. In the fall of 2015, Stanford enrolled 15 transfer students; Yale, 24. Cornell and Georgetown University, known for accepting transfers, took in 497 and 186, respectively.

USC, by contrast, accepted 1,505 transfers from 350 colleges. They made up almost one-third of its new undergraduates. About 800 transferred from a community college. Many were the first in their families to attend college. Most were on financial aid.

Recruiting and accepting a significant number of transfers has helped change the demographics of USC. The campus is no longer majority white; about 23% of undergraduates are eligible for Pell Grants, federal financial aid for low-income students.