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Marshall Tuck announced Monday that he will launch another bid for state superintendent of public instruction.

The position has little direct authority over California's schools, but Tuck said he would use it to set a direction for the governor, State Board of Education and Legislature.

In 2014, Tuck ran for the position against Tom Torlakson, and lost. That year, it was the most expensive election on the state ballot. Tuck was funded by backers of education reform and charter schools, while Torlakson had the support of teachers unions.

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  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
(Peter Bennett / For The Times)

A bill to combat the shortage of teachers by giving them tax breaks has begun to make its way through the California Legislature.

If passed, Senate Bill 807, or the Teacher Recruitment and Retention Act of 2017, would help teachers two ways.

First, it would give new teachers tax credits for the money they spent to earn full teaching credentials. The credits would cover such costs as college tuition and certification tests. These expenses could be entirely recouped entirely over five years. 

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • California State University
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
  • Community Colleges
  • For Parents
(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

Michael Clara, a community activist, signed power of attorney papers for two families who feared deportation.
Michael Clara, a community activist, signed power of attorney papers for two families who feared deportation. (David Montero / Los Angeles Times)

She saw the news of the raids happening around the country and felt helpless. Scared. She had lived here for more than a decade, following her father’s advice: Work hard and stay out of trouble.

But suddenly it felt as though trouble was looking for her. Lorena Napola worried about her four children. What if she were hauled away? Who would make sure they got to school? To doctors’ appointments? To church?

Several dozen Cal State Fullerton students protest the possible tuition hike in front of the Cal State chancellor's office in Long Beach.
Several dozen Cal State Fullerton students protest the possible tuition hike in front of the Cal State chancellor's office in Long Beach. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

Seizing on growing concerns over college affordability, California lawmakers are poised to propose what would be the most generous college aid plan in the nation, covering not just tuition but also living expenses that have led to spiraling student debt.

The plan, to be formally rolled out by Assembly Democrats at a news conference Monday morning, would supplement California’s existing aid programs, with the aim of eradicating the need for student loans for nearly 400,000 students in the Cal State and University of California systems. It also would boost grants to community college students and give those attending them full time a tuition-free first year.

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Education Secretary Betsy DeVos
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos (Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press)

Palo Alto school officials have not done enough to protect students and faculty who said they were sexually harassed and assaulted, according to a U.S. Department of Education investigation

The department's Office for Civil Rights investigates cases in which schools are accused of violating federals laws such as Title IX, which outlaws sex-based discrimination in schools.

After promising to make changes, Palo Alto Unified School District will keep its federal funding under terms of a resolution agreement with the department. 

  • K-12
  • HS Insider

No one is more affected by the education system than students themselves. With inside knowledge on the issues we cover, students have important things to say. Working with High School Insider, The Times’ youth journalism platform, Essential Education will be giving young voices a space to report on issues they care about, from gender-neutral bathrooms to campus Islamophobia.

High School Insider offers a content platform that publishes student work on LATimes.com, as well as classroom resources, conferences, contests and paid internships. The aim is to amplify student voices around the issues that matter to them, with a focus on underserved schools and communities.

Students at a High School Insider fall journalism conference at USC.
Students at a High School Insider fall journalism conference at USC. (Kyle Finck / LA Times)

If you know any schools interested in getting involved or would like more information about the program, email project lead Kyle Finck at kyle.finck@latimes.com

Students at South Pasadena High School in 2014.
Students at South Pasadena High School in 2014. (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)

South Pasadena High School was placed on lockdown Friday morning as authorities investigated a social media posting, officials said.

“There is no reason for panic,” Principal Janet Anderson said in a message sent to parents. “We just want to exercise the utmost caution. All staff and students are remaining in place with doors locked.”

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  • K-12
(San Diego Union-Tribune)

Marian Kim-Phelps was approved as superintendent at the Poway Unified School District’s board meeting Tuesday night on a split vote that heralded renewed warfare between the board members.

The board's votes to hire Kim-Phelps as superintendent, held in closed session, and to approve her contract, in open session, were both 3-2, with board President Michelle O’Connor-Ratcliff, Vice President T.J. Zane and member Darshana Patel voting yes, and members Kimberley Beatty and Charles Sellers voting no.

Tom Torlakson
Tom Torlakson (Andrew Seng / Associated Press)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide: