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San Diego County middle school teacher Shane Parmely was detained for more than an hour by Border Patrol agents at a checkpoint in New Mexico because she refused to say whether she was a U.S. citizen.

Parmely’s family helped her film the incident, which she posted Friday evening on her Facebook account in several segments that were widely shared. Parmely told Border Patrol agents that she believed she did not have to answer their questions. One agent showed her a card listing immigration law and a Supreme Court case decision that give Border Patrol agents authority to operate checkpoints within 100 miles of the border and to ask questions about citizenship without warrants.

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  • Higher Education
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Rafe Esquith
Rafe Esquith

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  • Higher Education
Heather Mac Donald speaks in April through live-stream video at Claremont McKenna College as protesters outside block access to the auditorium.
Heather Mac Donald speaks in April through live-stream video at Claremont McKenna College as protesters outside block access to the auditorium. (Claremont McKenna College)

Claremont McKenna College has suspended three students for a year and two others for a semester for blocking access to a campus event to protest a speaker known for defending police against Black Lives Matter activists.

The action, announced last week, arises out of an April 6 demonstration during which students and others ignored temporary barriers and blocked entrances to the Athenaeum and Kravis Center, where author and commentator Heather Mac Donald was scheduled to speak.

(Alex J. Berliner / Associated Press)

Four days after The Times published a story about drug use by the then-dean of USC’s medical school, the university announced it was moving to fire Dr. Carmen A. Puliafito and said it was “outraged and disgusted” by his conduct.

It remains unclear when top USC officials first learned about the allegations involving Puliafito. But The Times made repeated inquiries over the last 15 months about Puliafito, in some cases describing information reporters had gathered about the dean.

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(Ashley Landis / TNS)

After dividing North Carolina, the battle over regulating transgender bathroom access has become one of the most bitter and contentious political issues in Texas in recent history, exposing a widening fault line between liberal cities and the conservative state, as well as social conservatives and more centrist, business-friendly Republican legislators.

Following more than 10 hours of testimony — mostly from those opposed to a bathroom bill — the Senate State Affairs Committee approved a bill Friday that would restrict access to bathrooms, showers and changing facilities in government buildings and public schools based on the sex listed on a person’s birth certificate.

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(Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

The state has picked a senior Los Angeles schools administrator, Thelma Meléndez de Santa Ana, to lead the troubled Inglewood Unified School District.

The Inglewood school system, which is just east of Los Angeles International Airport, has long struggled with low academic achievement and declining enrollment, including the last five years under state control.

Former Hobart Boulevard Elementary School teacher Rafe Esquith, who was fired after allegations that he made inappropriate comments in front of students, will be allowed to proceed with his defamation lawsuit against L.A. Unified, a state appellate court ruled Thursday.

The court upheld a lower court ruling from last year, which denied a district motion to dismiss the lawsuit.

Esquith ran a theater nonprofit for his students, many of whom were low income, and was nationally recognized for his teaching methods.

  • K-12
Joaquin Carcaño is among the plaintiffs in a suit challenging a law passed to replace North Carolina's so-called bathroom bill.
Joaquin Carcaño is among the plaintiffs in a suit challenging a law passed to replace North Carolina's so-called bathroom bill. (Gerry Broome / Associated Press)

Transgender people in North Carolina are still effectively prevented from using restrooms matching their gender identity under a law that replaced the state's notorious "bathroom bill" earlier this year, according to a lawsuit filed Friday.

The replacement law continues the harms of its predecessor by leaving restroom policies in the hands of state lawmakers and preventing local governments or school systems from setting rules or offering guidance, the complaint states.

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
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Delaine Eastin
Delaine Eastin (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

(Alex J. Berliner / Associated Press)

The union that represents the Pasadena police officer who was disciplined for not filing a prompt report on a drug overdose witnessed by the then-dean of USC’s medical school is conducting a legal review of the incident, the labor organization said Thursday.

A tip about the March 2016 overdose of a young woman at the Hotel Constance in Pasadena led to a Times investigation that found that Dr. Carmen Puliafito associated with criminals and drug abusers who said they used methamphetamine and other drugs with him while he headed the Keck School of Medicine.