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Reed Hastings
Reed Hastings (Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg)

If the Los Angeles school board elections were a movie, then the nominee for best supporting actor might go to an individual who so far has received little attention: Reed Hastings.

Based on documents reviewed by The Times, the founder of Netflix has contributed close to $5 million since last September to the California Charter Schools Assn. Advocates, a major conduit of funds for school board candidates backed by charter school supporters. His most recent contribution was $1 million on Tuesday.

Another major recent contributor is a familiar name in education politics. Eli Broad put in $400,000 last Friday. 

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  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
  • Charter Schools
Reed Hastings
Reed Hastings (Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg)

If the Los Angeles school board elections were a movie, then the nominee for best supporting actor might go to an individual who so far has received little attention: Reed Hastings.

Based on documents reviewed by The Times, the founder of Netflix has contributed close to $5 million since last September to the California Charter Schools Assn. Advocates, a major conduit of funds for school board candidates backed by charter school supporters. His most recent contribution was $1 million on Tuesday.

Another major recent contributor is a familiar name in education politics. Eli Broad put in $400,000 last Friday. 

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California

Nine out of 10 universities and colleges reported no campus rapes in 2015, according to an analysis of federal data released Wednesday by the American Assn. of University Women. 

But the association sharply questioned whether the 11,000 U.S. colleges included in the analysis were doing enough to encourage victims to report sexual violence. 

“If these numbers were accurate there’d be cause for celebration, but we know for a fact they’re not,” Lisa M. Maatz, the association's vice president of government relations and advocacy, said in a statement. “These numbers don’t reflect campus climate surveys and academic research, let alone what we’ve heard from students themselves." 

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
Students at Bethune-Cookman University booed and turned their backs while Donald Trump's education chief Betsy DeVos gave a commencement speech on Wednesday.

The contents of Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' commencement speech Wednesday at Bethune-Cookman University, a historically black college in Daytona Beach, Fla., was pretty standard: Listen to people who disagree with you, serve your country, and give back.

But the reception was raucous. Students booed and turned their backs while President Trump's Education chief spoke.

DeVos delivered her speech even after students used social media and online petitions to try to prevent her appearance.

Leah Bell died when a personal watercraft crashed into a boat she was on in Copenhagen.
Leah Bell died when a personal watercraft crashed into a boat she was on in Copenhagen. (Courtesy of Pomona College)

Two students — Leah Bell from Pomona College and Linsey Malia from Stonehill College in Massachusetts — were killed Saturday in Copenhagen when a personal watercraft struck the boat they were in, officials said.

Five other students in a study-abroad program were injured in the crash, according to DIS Study Abroad in Scandinavia. The program’s students were on a boating excursion to celebrate the final weeks of their semester abroad.

“This is tragic news for Leah’s family, friends and for our entire community,” Pomona College said in a statement.

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Leah Bell died when a personal watercraft crashed into a boat she was on in Copenhagen.
Leah Bell died when a personal watercraft crashed into a boat she was on in Copenhagen. (Courtesy of Pomona College)

Two students — Leah Bell from Pomona College and Linsey Malia from Stonehill College in Massachusetts — were killed Saturday in Copenhagen when a personal watercraft struck the boat they were in, officials said.

Five other students in a study-abroad program were injured in the crash, according to DIS Study Abroad in Scandinavia. The program’s students were on a boating excursion to celebrate the final weeks of their semester abroad.

“This is tragic news for Leah’s family, friends and for our entire community,” Pomona College said in a statement.

  • K-12
  • HS Insider
(McKenna Thurber / HS Insider)

McKenna Thurber, a skater and a junior at El Camino Real Charter, writes about skateboarding's deep roots in Southern California. 

On the blistering, dirty and cracked streets of Southern California, it is difficult to avoid skateboards.

It is not unusual to see toddlers, enveloped in protective padding, learning how to skate in their front yard on weekends. On campuses, stairwells and cafeterias become ramps and obstacles. Each afternoon, groups of students are seen skating home from school.

  • For Parents
(Netflix)

Since the drama series “13 Reasons Why” debuted March 31 on Netflix, hundreds of school districts across the country have sent letters home advising parents that their kids may be watching a show that some mental health experts argue glamorizes suicide. Due to the graphic depictions of suicide, rape, bullying, slut shaming and drunk driving, the National Assn. of School Psychologists has recommended “that vulnerable youth, especially those who have any degree of suicidal ideation,” do not view the series.

We reached out to U.S. educators to get their thoughts. With so many teenagers creating memes and tweeting about the series, we wanted to find out how the show was actually being discussed IRL.

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  • For Parents
(Netflix)

Since the drama series “13 Reasons Why” debuted March 31 on Netflix, hundreds of school districts across the country have sent letters home advising parents that their kids may be watching a show that some mental health experts argue glamorizes suicide. Due to the graphic depictions of suicide, rape, bullying, slut shaming and drunk driving, the National Assn. of School Psychologists has recommended “that vulnerable youth, especially those who have any degree of suicidal ideation,” do not view the series.

We reached out to U.S. educators to get their thoughts. With so many teenagers creating memes and tweeting about the series, we wanted to find out how the show was actually being discussed IRL.

(Alex Wong / Getty Images)

The time has come for the California State Board of Education to formulate its plan for satisfying the Every Student Succeeds Act, the Obama-era replacement of No Child Left Behind. This change will be the major topic of discussion at the board meeting on Wednesday and Thursday.

Where No Child used a stringent system to reward and punish schools for their performance on test scores, ESSA, as it's known, gives states much more leeway in deciding how to hold schools accountable for good performance. 

With the Trump administration in office — and an Education secretary who insists that states and school districts do much of the decision-making — states will get even more freedom than they had expected. Trump in March signed a bill that trashed Obama's rules for ESSA state compliance.