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There have been 186 shootings on school campuses in the U.S. since 20 children and six adults were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., on Dec. 14, 2012, according to Everytown For Gun Safety, an advocacy group.

On Monday, the latest school shooting occurred when a man walked into a San Bernardino special-education class and killed his wife, a student and himself.

The Times has created a graphic that displays where each of these incidents occurred. Explore the graphic here.

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(Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

North Park Elementary School in San Bernardino was closed on Tuesday, the day after a man walked into a special education classroom and killed his wife, an 8-year-old student and then himself.

In the aftermath of the attack, children in that classroom and school and in surrounding schools — as well as their parents and teachers — will have to cope with what they experienced.

Counselors will be available for North Park students, parents and staff Tuesday and Wednesday at Del Vallejo Middle School, said Maria Garcia, spokeswoman for the San Bernardino City Unified School District.

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(Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. A report found that charter schools are growing where they're not needed.
  2. L.A. Unified school board president Steve Zimmer has barely raised any money for his reelection campaign since the March primary.

In California:

  1. A man estranged from his wife showed up at her special-needs classroom at a San Bernardino elementary school and fatally shot her and an 8-year-old boy.
  2. Parents were confused about how and where to pick up their children after the attack.
  3. The mother of the slain teacher says she was devoted to her students.

Nationwide:

  1. New York soon will start offering free tuition to working- and middle-class students at its public colleges and universities. Students who receive the aid have to live and work in the state, at least for as many years as they got the help.
  2. How a homeless man who was once on an MTV reality show made it through college.
SWAT officer stands guard.
SWAT officer stands guard. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

A teacher and an 8-year-old boy were shot and killed Monday morning at an elementary school in San Bernardino after the teacher’s husband opened fire inside a special needs classroom before turning the gun on himself, police said.

Cedric Anderson, 53, of Riverside entered a classroom at North Park Elementary School and opened fire on his wife, Karen Elaine Smith, about 10:30 a.m. before taking his own life, according to San Bernardino Police Chief Jarrod Burguan.

Two students standing behind Smith were also shot, police said. The boy, identified as Jonathan Martinez, was airlifted to Loma Linda Medical Center, where he was later pronounced dead. A 9-year-old student who was wounded remains hospitalized in stable condition, Burguan said.

At North Park Elementary, students could be seen gathered on a field at a corner of the campus near Northpark Boulevard and H Street around 11:40 a.m., accompanied by teachers and guarded by law enforcement officers carrying long guns.

Some parents at the scene said there was confusion over where to collect their children as information circulated that they should be picked up at either Cajon High School or Cal State San Bernardino.

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Map shows approximate location of North Park Elementary School.
Map shows approximate location of North Park Elementary School. (Los Angeles Times)

Two adults were killed and two students were injured Monday morning at an elementary school in San Bernardino in what officials are describing as a murder-suicide.

The students were airlifted to local hospital and their conditions are unknown, said San Bernardino police Lt. Vicki Cervantes.

Rally for Alliance College-Ready charters
Rally for Alliance College-Ready charters (Pamela Hassell / Associated Press)

Charter schools are proliferating where they aren’t needed while state funding continues to support even those charters that violate state law, according to a report released Monday by a research and advocacy group.

The new research by an Oakland group called In The Public Interest looks at where charter schools are increasing in number and where schools are needed based on enrollment. The two trend lines do not correspond, researchers found — especially in the Los Angeles Unified School District, where the number of school-age children has declined even as the number of charters has exploded.

U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) speaks at a rally pushing a California Assembly bill aimed at reducing child poverty in the state
U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) speaks at a rally pushing a California Assembly bill aimed at reducing child poverty in the state (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. A demonstration at Claremont McKenna College was among the latest nationwide to impede the appearance of a conservative speaker.
  2. Politicians and advocates rallied to push a California Assembly bill that seeks to cut in half the percentage of children in the state living below the poverty line by fiscal year 2039.

In California:

  1. Only a few of the state's biggest districts are using a state law that lets them enroll more 4-year-olds in transitional kindergarten.
  2. The California Department of Education is reorganizing its staff into teams.

Nationwide:

  1. Newly confirmed U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch will soon hear a case on the limits of public funding for religious schools.
  2. States have filed lawsuits that accuse lender Navient of preying on college students.
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(Michael Reynolds / European Pressphoto Agency)

On April 19, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a long pending religious-rights challenge to state bans on the funding of church schools. About three-fourths of states have constitutions that prohibit spending taxpayer money “directly or indirectly, in aid of any church, sect or denomination of religion,” as Missouri’s Constitution puts it.

Advocates of “school choice” say these laws stand in the way of public funding for religious schools. In January 2016, shortly before Justice Antonin Scalia died, the court voted to hear a Missouri case that challenged these funding bans as reflecting unconstitutional discrimination against religion.

Heather MacDonald
Heather MacDonald (Claremont McKenna College)

Administrators expressed disappointment and threatened discipline in the wake of a demonstration that disrupted a planned public event last week featuring conservative commentator and author Heather MacDonald at Claremont McKenna College.

The campus demonstration was among the latest nationwide to impede the appearance of a conservative speaker.